March 2017 XVI – National Gathering

March 2017 XVI

National Gathering June 2017

Hope everyone had a good Mardi Gras. Well we are just a few days over 3 months till we all meet at KHAO for the Wrench and Elbow Bending (June 9-11) followed immediately by the GPA National Gathering (June 11-15).

Here is information to get you started.

Schedule:

Friday and Saturday
June 9-10, 9am till 5pm Wrench and Elbow Bending on various topics.

Sunday June 11
9am till 3pm Wrench Bending
3pm – 5pm Social time and arrivals
5 pm – Till BBQ and social Mixer

Monday June 12
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 11 am Tour – Jungle Jims International Market
Lunch on own
1pm – 5-pm Airplane Games (or seminars if wx bad)
Dinner on own

Tuesday June 13
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 12 pm Seminars (or games in wx yesterday was bad)
Lunch on own
1pm – 5pm Discussion and Seminars
5pm – 7pm Dinner on own
7pm – 8pm Ice Cream
8pm – 11pm Hangar Party (Hangar flying, etc)

Wednesday June 14
9am – 12 pm Finish Reindeer airplane games
12pm – 2 pm Lunch on own
2pm – 6pm Free time to explore/social time
6pm – 9pm Banquet

Thursday June 15
Departures

Airplane Games (Events)

Spot Parking
Precision Taxi
Rigged Preflight
Rodeo Tiedown
Broken Towbar (Mens and Women)

We will have a First and Second place Trophy for each event

Other Awards
Most Recent Private Pilot
Most Recent Instrument
Most Recent Advanced Rating (Commercial, ATP)
Most Recent Mechanic
People’s Choice Award
Mechanics Award
Fire Awards

Hotels:
Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles

Discounts: Ask for the ‘Cincinnati Jet Center’ Discount

Rental Cars
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

If you are interested in presenting a seminar, please get in touch with us. We have a few planned that we know you will enjoy.

A new T-shirt design is in the works for the event and it will feature a pocket.

We have kept this short and sweet.

Be sure and Book your reservation for the event, we expect the total fee to be $50 for this event which will include the banquet, reception, and the hangar party.

Hope to see you in June, fly safe.

Your GPA

July 13, 2016 – Volume X

July 13, 2016 – Volume X

Bowling Green

We are just 1 week away from the National Gathering in Bowling Green, KY. Looking forward to seeing you there.

Schedule

Tuesday, July 19th – Early Birds and formation guidelines, perfect for first timers to the art.

Wednesday, July 20th – Welcome Day and Reception 7pm (Airport – then to Hotel Bar)

Thursday, July 21st – Airport Activities and Hotel Activities
Airport – Seminars (9-12)
Hotel – Lunch (12-2)
Railpark Tour
Dinner on Own
Hotel – Pool Hangout 7pm – till

Friday, July 22nd – Airport Activities and Hotel Activities
Corvette Museum (9-12)
Lunch on Own
Airport – Seminars (2-6)
Dinner on own
Hotel – Pool/Bar Hangout/Membership Discussion 7pm – till

Saturday, July 23rd – Banquet
Airport – Maintenance, Airplane Looking, Discussions
Lunch on Own
Hotel – 2 pm meet for Mammoth Cave tour
Hotel – Bar 7
Dinner 8

Sunday, July 24th – Departure Day and Group Flight to Oshkosh

Group Flight Oshkosh

Interested members see Mark Matthews.

Early Morning Scenic Flights

Dawn Patrol photo flights. Want a really nice picture of your plane in flight? We’ll be getting interested parties together for the shoots in the am before the official day starts. Alternately, it is the perfect time during the quiet of the morning to see and look at planes.

Thursday Lunch – ‘A Taste of Italy

taste of Italy
•mixed garden greens with chef’s choice of dressing, including Italian
•marinated button mushroom salad
•pasta bar
pastas: penne,, or cheese tortellini pastas
sauces: alfredo, traditional marinara
• vegetable lasagna
•Italian green beans
•garlic bread
•assorted cheesecakes

Saturday Night Dinner – ‘A Taste of Kentucky

a taste of Kentucky
•tossed salad bar with dressings
•cole slaw & potato salad entrees
•fried cat fish fillets
•southern fried chicken, hot & crispy
•pulled pork barbecue accompaniments
•corn on the cob
•baked beans
•corn bread muffins
•watermelon slices (in season)
•warm fruit cobbler (year round)
•iced or sweet tea, lemonade & coffee service
• ice cream

Hope that whets your appetite.

Lou Evans – BFR Check outs

Lou Evans is a CFII who has volunteered his time at the Gathering if you need a BFR or other related flying needs. Please look Lou up or contact him via the website.

Final Prep

We’ve talked to the hotel and the FBO and Airport Staff. They know we are coming. Our FBO is CO-Mar Aviation (Unicom 123.0) and their phone is 270-781-9797. There is fuel available from the FBO and also a slight savings ($0.38) at the self-serve pump.

Rental Cars

If you have a rental car during the event, please let Luann know: 513-227-9074 for coordination.

Fun Games

There has been some talk of doing a few games. We think we have a few that you may like.

April 18, 2017 – Volume XVII

Hello GPA!

In the last 2 weeks we have had 55 new members join, let us hope that this trend of 2-4 people a day continues.

As an interesting fact, our 1055 members own more than half of all the Grumman registered in the United States!  Yes, that is right, some of our members own more than one Grumman.  The winner, who is shy, owns 11.  Now in truth they are all not flying, but still an impressive number.

Two Major Events Back-To-Back

These events are both at KHAO

We have in June two events that will flow seamlessly into each other bridging the way with a Hangar Party featuring a live singer.

The first event is the 'Midwest Wrench and Elbow Bending Weekend' the third of these events that we have held around the country.  

Here come the details:
http://www.grummanpilotsassociation.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/WE-Bending.jpg

June 11-13, 2017

This is a 3 day event which is intended to advance the delicate maintenance our aircraft require. As Ken will say, “This is about teaching how our planes need to be maintained, not free mechanical work!”  It is officially sponsored and hosted by Yankee Aviation, presenting interesting seminars as will a couple of other Grumman Savvy mechanics.  There will be hands on maintenance demos and plenty of opportunity for questions and answers during, and following, the sessions.

Rental Cars:
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number)
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

What To Expect If Yours is a Demo Airplane
If your airplane is used for instruction purposes showing how to maintain or fix a problem, then you can expect to pay for any parts and material used in that process. The labor is donated by the gurus to educate others, and the hosting shop is donating the workspace and tools, so if you want to make a donation, make it to the hosting organization GPA.

There is plenty of aircraft parking on the ramp and there will be ample “on site” food prepared by Roscoe and other volunteers on Friday evening, Saturday lunch, and possibly Saturday evening so plan to “chip in” on the food (and beverage) runs made to local stores. (There will be a recommended amount announced.) We may have one meal at one of the nearby restaurants, possibly Saturday evening.

One of the lessons learned at the first Wrench and Elbow Bending Weekend was that any schedule is no good after the first plane. You find stuff not expected and so cover stuff out of schedule. So, like our planes, we will be winging it! We’ll try and get all the subject in in some order.

Subjects to be Covered

  • Engine overhauls and who to do it. Costs to expect and the pros & cons of choices
  • Sparkplugs, Cleaning, Testing, & Gaping. Type of plugs best for which engines
  • Tires, fairing mounts, modifying for access to air tires, cleanups available & benefits
  • Repairing plastic parts with DevCon Plastic Welder & screen material & alternatives
  • AD 79-22-04 & AMOC. SB 163A, SK-150 and the history of this AD and alternate
  • Split nose cowling STCs & Field Approvals. Power Point on doing the ADC STC.
  • Vertical split vs. horizontal. Deviating from the basic STC. How far off can you go.
  • R&R Canopy, clean & service tracks, explain changing seals, bumpers, lubrication
  • Removing seats. Checking security of brackets to spar. Inspecting seat mechanics.
  • Bleeding brakes. Inspecting and changing rudder springs & forward fuselage floor
  • Torque tube and Yoke Assembly inspection. Repaired and modified replacements
  • Rigging the Rudder. Checking clevis bolts and hardware for condition & replacing
  • Engine compartment, Baffles, Seals, Cowl Latches (condition & adjustment) all models. Fixing cracks and wear areas, prevention methods you should do.
  • Corrosion. What to look for, how to fix, and how to prevent it or stop in its tracks
  • Engine mount extrusions and corrosion, inspection and prevention
  • Nose gear, Fork adjustment, Axle tightness, Proper maintenance and fork bushings
  • Elevator & Trim Tab alignment, freefall test & proper maintenance & lubrication
  • Torque tubes, Supports & bearings. Changing bearings & shimming with tape.
  • Rigging, using fixtures, limits and fudging as much as is legal. Flap tricks for speed
  • A “Super Pre-Flight” inspection. Using spray silicone on canopy tracks and bearings

We will start about noon on Friday so folks can fly in. Saturday and Sunday we will meet at 9am and chat and look at planes before moving in for the next subject airplane.

Expenses to cover:
This event is sponsored by Roscoe & Yankee Aviation and Ken Blackman of Air Mods NW
and there is no charge for the seminars and demonstrations. The food and supplies, provided, are
paid supplied by the host and it is requested all make a donation to “the Kitty” to reimburse him. Use your own judgment but an amount of around $10 each for lunches and perhaps $5 for coffee
and muffins seems appropriate. The meal(s) at hotels and restaurants will be paid direct to them.

There are at least two good hotels near the airport which are:

Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles Ask for Cincinnati Jet Center Discount ($90 / night)

Information will be posted on The Grumman Gang as well as here on the GPA website. Plans are still being made and soon will be more formal so watch for updates. For now, just put these dates on your calendar and make whatever plans needed to attend. Please contact me with your RSVP as soon as possible at roscoe@yankee-aviation.com or call me at 513-519-7008 for questions on lodging and other things yet to be posted.

Now the ‘Wrench Bending’ ends about 2-3 pm, followed by a BBQ and hangar party that goes till?

The welcome reception for the National Gathering will begin with the social event of the Hangar Party and continue Monday through Wednesday.

Here are the details for that:

June 11-14, 2017

Scheduled immediately after the Midwest Wrench and Elbow Bending this National Gathering will be held early in the summer when the weather is very nice.  There has been some interest in a beginners Formation Flying Clinic.

The Hogan Brothers will be offering rides in their historic Waco for a fuel donation.  We are also trying to get a open 2-holer Waco for rides.  Stay Tuned!

Sunday June 11
3pm – 5pm Social time and arrivals
5 pm – Till BBQ and social Mixer, Cash Bar (Live Music – Easy Listening)

Monday June 12
6am – 9am Morning Flights, Photo Flights,
9am – 11 am Tour – Jungle Jim’s International Market
Lunch on own
1pm – 5-pm Airplane Games (or seminars if wx bad)
Dinner on own

Tuesday June 13
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 12 pm Seminars (or games in wx yesterday was bad)
Lunch on own
1pm – 5pm Discussion and Seminars
5pm – 7pm Dinner on own
7pm – 8pm Ice Cream
8pm – 11pm Hangar Party (Live Music, Cash Bar, Hangar flying, etc)

Wednesday June 14
9am – 12 pm Finish Reindeer airplane games
12pm – 2 pm Lunch on own
2pm – 6pm Free time to explore/social time
6pm – 9pm Banquet

Thursday June 15
Departures

Airplane Games (Events)

Spot Parking
Precision Taxi
Rigged Preflight
Rodeo Tiedown
Broken Towbar (Mens and Women)

We will have a First and Second place Trophy for each event

Other Awards
Most Recent Private Pilot
Most Recent Instrument
Most Recent Advanced Rating (Commercial, ATP)
Most Recent Mechanic
People’s Choice Award
Mechanics Award
Fire Awards

Hotels:
Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles

Discounts: Ask for the ‘Cincinnati Jet Center’ Discount

Rental Cars
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

If you are interested in presenting a seminar, please get in touch with us. We have a few planned that we know you will enjoy.

A new T-shirt design is in the works for the event and it will feature a pocket.

We have kept this short and sweet.

Be sure and Book your reservation for the event, we expect the total fee to be $50 for this event which will include the banquet, reception, and the hangar party.

Hope to see you in June, fly safe.

Your GPA

Registering For The Events

You can register for either or both events by clicking on the event either in the Menu Pick ‘Gatherings’ or by selecting it from the upcoming Event widget on any page of the website.  We gave you three ways to get to it.  Also, all the info has been put into this email newsletter so you do have to go to the website to see all the details.

Registration for the National Gathering right now is $50 via the website.  After April 30, it will be raised to 75 since it will cause a scramble to prepare for the event coming.  So register early.  You can always pay at the door and we will work to make sure we have room and food for all who attend.

So, register TODAY, and we will see you in June!

You GPA.

‘Grumman Pilots’ YouTube Channel Videos

We have 226 videos now on the channel covering many aspects of our airplane.  If you have a request, just send it in and we will try and make that video.  Thanks!

April 18, 2017 – Volume XVII

Hello GPA!

In the last 2 weeks we have had 55 new members join, let us hope that this trend of 2-4 people a day continues.

As an interesting fact, our 1055 members own more than half of all the Grumman registered in the United States!  Yes, that is right, some of our members own more than one Grumman.  The winner, who is shy, owns 11.  Now in truth they are all not flying, but still an impressive number.

Two Major Events Back-To-Back

We have in June two events that will flow seamlessly into each other bridging the way with a Hangar Party featuring a live singer.

Both at KHAO, Hamilton, OH.

The first event is the 'Midwest Wrench and Elbow Bending Weekend' the third of these events that we have held around the country.  

Here come the details:
http://www.grummanpilotsassociation.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/WE-Bending.jpg

This is a 3 day event which is intended to advance the delicate maintenance our aircraft require. As Ken will say, “This is about teaching how our planes need to be maintained, not free mechanical work!”  It is officially sponsored and hosted by Yankee Aviation, presenting interesting seminars as will a couple of other Grumman Savvy mechanics.  There will be hands on maintenance demos and plenty of opportunity for questions and answers during, and following, the sessions.

Rental Cars:
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number)
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

What To Expect If Yours is a Demo Airplane
If your airplane is used for instruction purposes showing how to maintain or fix a problem, then you can expect to pay for any parts and material used in that process. The labor is donated by the gurus to educate others, and the hosting shop is donating the workspace and tools, so if you want to make a donation, make it to the hosting organization GPA.

There is plenty of aircraft parking on the ramp and there will be ample “on site” food prepared by Roscoe and other volunteers on Friday evening, Saturday lunch, and possibly Saturday evening so plan to “chip in” on the food (and beverage) runs made to local stores. (There will be a recommended amount announced.) We may have one meal at one of the nearby restaurants, possibly Saturday evening.

One of the lessons learned at the first Wrench and Elbow Bending Weekend was that any schedule is no good after the first plane. You find stuff not expected and so cover stuff out of schedule. So, like our planes, we will be winging it! We’ll try and get all the subject in in some order.

Subjects to be Covered

  • Engine overhauls and who to do it. Costs to expect and the pros & cons of choices
  • Sparkplugs, Cleaning, Testing, & Gaping. Type of plugs best for which engines
  • Tires, fairing mounts, modifying for access to air tires, cleanups available & benefits
  • Repairing plastic parts with DevCon Plastic Welder & screen material & alternatives
  • AD 79-22-04 & AMOC. SB 163A, SK-150 and the history of this AD and alternate
  • Split nose cowling STCs & Field Approvals. Power Point on doing the ADC STC.
  • Vertical split vs. horizontal. Deviating from the basic STC. How far off can you go.
  • R&R Canopy, clean & service tracks, explain changing seals, bumpers, lubrication
  • Removing seats. Checking security of brackets to spar. Inspecting seat mechanics.
  • Bleeding brakes. Inspecting and changing rudder springs & forward fuselage floor
  • Torque tube and Yoke Assembly inspection. Repaired and modified replacements
  • Rigging the Rudder. Checking clevis bolts and hardware for condition & replacing
  • Engine compartment, Baffles, Seals, Cowl Latches (condition & adjustment) all models. Fixing cracks and wear areas, prevention methods you should do.
  • Corrosion. What to look for, how to fix, and how to prevent it or stop in its tracks
  • Engine mount extrusions and corrosion, inspection and prevention
  • Nose gear, Fork adjustment, Axle tightness, Proper maintenance and fork bushings
  • Elevator & Trim Tab alignment, freefall test & proper maintenance & lubrication
  • Torque tubes, Supports & bearings. Changing bearings & shimming with tape.
  • Rigging, using fixtures, limits and fudging as much as is legal. Flap tricks for speed
  • A “Super Pre-Flight” inspection. Using spray silicone on canopy tracks and bearings

We will start about noon on Friday so folks can fly in. Saturday and Sunday we will meet at 9am and chat and look at planes before moving in for the next subject airplane.

Expenses to cover:
This event is sponsored by Roscoe & Yankee Aviation and Ken Blackman of Air Mods NW
and there is no charge for the seminars and demonstrations. The food and supplies, provided, are
paid supplied by the host and it is requested all make a donation to “the Kitty” to reimburse him. Use your own judgment but an amount of around $10 each for lunches and perhaps $5 for coffee
and muffins seems appropriate. The meal(s) at hotels and restaurants will be paid direct to them.

There are at least two good hotels near the airport which are:

Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles Ask for Cincinnati Jet Center Discount ($90 / night)

Information will be posted on The Grumman Gang as well as here on the GPA website. Plans are still being made and soon will be more formal so watch for updates. For now, just put these dates on your calendar and make whatever plans needed to attend. Please contact me with your RSVP as soon as possible at roscoe@yankee-aviation.com or call me at 513-519-7008 for questions on lodging and other things yet to be posted.

Now the ‘Wrench Bending’ ends about 2-3 pm, followed by a BBQ and hangar party that goes till?

The welcome reception for the National Gathering will begin with the social event of the Hangar Party and continue Monday through Wednesday.

Here are the details for that:

Scheduled immediately after the Midwest Wrench and Elbow Bending this National Gathering will be held early in the summer when the weather is very nice.  There has been some interest in a beginners Formation Flying Clinic.

The Hogan Brothers will be offering rides in their historic Waco for a fuel donation.  We are also trying to get a open 2-holer Waco for rides.  Stay Tuned!

Sunday June 11
3pm – 5pm Social time and arrivals
5 pm – Till BBQ and social Mixer, Cash Bar (Live Music – Easy Listening)

Monday June 12
6am – 9am Morning Flights, Photo Flights,
9am – 11 am Tour – Jungle Jim’s International Market
Lunch on own
1pm – 5-pm Airplane Games (or seminars if wx bad)
Dinner on own

Tuesday June 13
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 12 pm Seminars (or games in wx yesterday was bad)
Lunch on own
1pm – 5pm Discussion and Seminars
5pm – 7pm Dinner on own
7pm – 8pm Ice Cream
8pm – 11pm Hangar Party (Live Music, Cash Bar, Hangar flying, etc)

Wednesday June 14
9am – 12 pm Finish Reindeer airplane games
12pm – 2 pm Lunch on own
2pm – 6pm Free time to explore/social time
6pm – 9pm Banquet

Thursday June 15
Departures

Airplane Games (Events)

Spot Parking
Precision Taxi
Rigged Preflight
Rodeo Tiedown
Broken Towbar (Mens and Women)

We will have a First and Second place Trophy for each event

Other Awards
Most Recent Private Pilot
Most Recent Instrument
Most Recent Advanced Rating (Commercial, ATP)
Most Recent Mechanic
People’s Choice Award
Mechanics Award
Fire Awards

Hotels:
Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles

Discounts: Ask for the ‘Cincinnati Jet Center’ Discount

Rental Cars
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

If you are interested in presenting a seminar, please get in touch with us. We have a few planned that we know you will enjoy.

A new T-shirt design is in the works for the event and it will feature a pocket.

We have kept this short and sweet.

Be sure and Book your reservation for the event, we expect the total fee to be $50 for this event which will include the banquet, reception, and the hangar party.

Hope to see you in June, fly safe.

Your GPA

Registering For The Events

You can register for either or both events by clicking on the event either in the Menu Pick ‘Gatherings’ or by selecting it from the upcoming Event widget on any page of the website.  We gave you three ways to get to it.  Also, all the info has been put into this email newsletter so you do have to go to the website to see all the details.

Registration for the National Gathering right now is $50 via the website.  After April 30, it will be raised to 75 since it will cause a scramble to prepare for the event coming.  So register early.  You can always pay at the door and we will work to make sure we have room and food for all who attend.

So, register TODAY, and we will see you in June!

You GPA.

‘Grumman Pilots’ YouTube Channel Videos

We have 226 videos now on the channel covering many aspects of our airplane.  If you have a request, just send it in and we will try and make that video.  Thanks!

April 7, 2017 – Volume XVI

Membership

You may have noticed that we are over 1,000 members now.  That is quite the feat considering that we are not yet 3 years old!

About half of the new members we get are mentioning that they found us from our YouTube videos.

YouTube Videos

We now have 215 videos of various types.  If you have not seen them yet you can find them on YouTube under our channel name Grumman Pilots‘.  Yes, it just that simple.  Happy watching.

National Gather June, 2017

This is just 2 months away and we have fleshed out the calendar fairly well on the events page.  We are planning two hangar parties so you can relax, chat with old and new friends and listen to the easy listening live singers.

We have also added games and flying activities this year so be prepared to have fun.  There is also a planned half day Formation clinic on the basics followed by 2-ship practice for beginners.  Stay tuned for more details.

Make you plans to attend, the wrench and elbow bending will flow right into the social events so plan on making both.

Be sure and register for the event on the event page so we can have a good headcount for food, etc.

See you in June!

February 14, 2017 – Volume XV

February, 2017, Volume XV

Passion

As members we all know the passion and love we feel for our special birds. One member also has the same feeling for college football. He was truly bummed when he had to drive down to a game in Florida (he lives in South Caroline) while his plane was in the avionics shop. Just goes to show we can have many loves in life.

National Gathering

June is rapidly approaching and we are gearing up for our double event.  June 9-11 will be our third ‘Wrench and Elbow Bending’ followed by the fourth national gathering.  Start making your plans, we have some fund stuff in store and will be in the next newsletter.

Key West Flight School

We had a new GPA member join last month who has a new mission. He plans on starting a flight school down in Key West, Florida and with his passion for Grummans, maybe they will be in the line. Stay tuned.

VIDEOS

We now have a custom YouTube URL, youtube.com/c/GrummanPilots.  As of this writing, we have 84 videos on various aspects of our planes. There are more being planned now. As, always your comments and suggestion are welcome.

We just made a pre-flight by the book, in this case the airframe manual, and we are working on a beyond the book that will help catch issues prior to them being an issue.

You can contribute your raw video to us and we will brand it and put it on the channel as long as it is something new. Don’t want a thousand cat videos!

Be sure and send in your suggestions as to topics, and any videos that you might have using your Grumman.

You may have noticed that commercials play at the beginning and this is generating revenue for the GPA. We never want to have dues or paid employees.

New Tools

Working as we type on making the DE-5005-502 elevator tool (this will be only for the AA1C) as well a track-sizing tool. Coming soon.

Also we are making 15 more aileron bullets and 15 more bearing sizing tools so holler if you want one, first come, first served.

Be sure and send in your suggestions as to topics, and any videos that you might have using your Grumman.

Membership

We are up to 960 members in 21 countries. Keep spreading the word.

Members Helping Members

The mission of the GPA is to create a community. Within this community we provide information about our planes, help, and sometimes even very special support.

We have a member who has fallen on troubled times, and when a offending cylinder grounded his plane, it was taken to a cylinder shop that ground the valve seat down too far. This meant that none of the 4 possible pushrods would give him the dry tappet clearance required, thus his intake valve would never fully close.

Another member several states away heard about this and send one of his used 800- hour but serviceable cylinder to me to install on the member’s plane. The sender did not want any money for that cylinder and so the receiver’s plane is now back in the air running smooth on 4 cylinders.

Now all that being said, please do not bury me under requests for free parts, etc.!

Love Is In the Air

This is perfect for Valentine’s Day. The US Post Office is issuing a skywriting postage Forever stamp. Inspired by Skytypers (they use Grumman Tigers), it is coming soon to a Post Office near you!

Digital Downloads

Coming soon to the ‘Store’ will be digital downloads. Just continuing to provide info and products in a timely fashion.

Coming Soon

Dan Baisley has created a cnc file for a 3-d printer and donated it to the GPA.  This file will be used to remake the step plugs that many of us are missing.  We are also putting this file in the public domain.  Thank You Dan!

Engine cooling is a “BAFFLING THING”

One of the most asked questions posed to me (and anyone else who will listen in many cases) is; “How can I keep my engine temps down to reasonable or even cool”? Well, there can be many causes but the most common is just plain lousy engine baffles and seals. I am shocked at how many professionals don’t have a clue how important keeping that air tight around the engine and properly exhausted out the bottom is to engine health. Through a few photos, and some verbal picture painting, I will try to answer that so often asked question.

First, let’s assume there is really no serious engine problem that can be causing high temps. Those possibilities are subject for other articles. Let me restate one of my favorite sayings; “Flying around in your air cooled sports car with gaps and rips in your baffle seals, tired old seals that do not even get near the cowling, and with improperly fitting metal parts, broken and cracked, ugly patches pop-riveted on, and (well you know what it looks like) leaking everywhere is the same as driving your prize 4 wheeler around with the radiator half full of coolant with leaky hoses and a loose radiator cap. IT’S GOING TO BURN IT UP!

So you decide to fix the problem, you or your mechanic try straightening up bent baffles, patch cracks, screw, rivet, or wire the stuff together and to he engine, then you order a roll of the crap sold for baffle seal material by the discount house of your choice. STOP RIGHT THERE! DON’T BE THAT STUPID! YOU WANT TO SAVE MONEY. IT’S NOT GOING TO MAKE REPLACING CRACKED CYLINDERS ANY CHEAPER IF YOU SAVE A FEW BUCKS ON SEALS AND PROPER BAFFLE MAINTENANCE.

First, let’s look at the metal baffle parts. The lower parts must fit snug around the cylinder fins and the front and back “lower wraps” must be held tight to the shape of the cylinder fins. The original design of our baffles used springs pulling these together to the inner cylinder baffles between the front and rear jugs. This design was not great s the springs would wear through the aluminum and let loose. Common practice is to safety wire them together, which has to be checked often, and looseness corrected. Some manufacturers used steel angle tabs and threaded rod to secure them, which is a better design and can be retrofitted on our planes. The metal needs to close out as much of the gaps as possible between the cylinders and case to force the downward push of air through the fins rather than past them.

The top seals must seal as tightly as possible to the upper cowling and around the engine. The aft baffle seals must curl forward and the sides inward to capture the air and inflate them tight to the cowling. Everywhere there is any irregularity in the cowling, the seal needs to be trimmed to fit tight around it. Overlaps need to have little slits made to keep air from escaping. The areas where the baffles touch the case should be sealed with RTV and gaps filled with it to where you can put a light under the cowl behind the engine, in the dark, and not see light looking in through the nose cowl inlets. Even filling around the ignition wires with RTV helps. The type of seal material is very important. It should be cloth reinforced, hold its form well, and be soft enough to flex so it will press tight to the upper cowl. Too thin and it will flop, too thick, it will flap, and without reinforcement it will tear. The best thickness I have found is 3/32″. I have use the same black “cloth inserted neoprene” material for over 30 years with great results. I buy it in 54″ wide rolls, 35 feet long, and cut it out with metal templates made from flattened out original Grumman seals. Each one is a specific shape and I sell it in complete kits, for each different model airplane, with the appropriate rivets and installation instructions. (Prices range from $69.95 to $99.95)

When we do a baffle job, we remove all the metal from the engine and make repairs or fabricate new parts as needed. We clean all corrosion, bead-blast if needed, etch and alodine the parts, then paint them with engine grade enamel that will withstand up to 500 degrees. Duplicolor brand spray cans from O’Reillys or other auto stores is what we use. Choose your color. I, personally, do not use the expensive silicone seal material or any other thing that I described above. Yes, it is only available in black. I happen to like it so there! I also like silver or white on the metal (gold if it suits you) and I like Lycoming Grey engines. (To each his own…) It is very easy to wrap up a grand in a proper baffle seal job but it will save much more than that in engine maintenance and make your temps look very happy.

O, yes, we have to mention how you are monitoring them. I love it when people ask me; “What cylinder should I put the probe(s) on”? My standard answer is; “All of them! Either install CHTs and EGTs on all cylinders, using a decent and accurate monitor, or don’t bother doing any of them. It will only get you in trouble. Having all EGTs and CHTs monitored allows you to see problems before they do damage and to much more efficiently lean out the engine for optimum performance and economy. The experienced pilot (who probably learned without fancy equipment) should be able to closely dial in their engine by “feeling” the thing in their fingertips and seat of their pants. This level of pilot may not need any gauge to tell them when the engine is “happy” but can supplement their skill with good equipment to make the best of both Worlds.

Once this is all done, as described, and you have means to see what is happening, then you can look at other areas to improve a particular problem or just get the whole thing down more if necessary. Each engine installation may have little things that will work to pinpoint certain problems that can be dealt with in an individual basis. Don’t expect the same trick to work on other installations. Some will and some won’t.

The accompanying photos will allow you to see what I am trying to describe and show what to shoot for as well as what NOT to do. Remember what I said about half empty radiators

Ken Blackman
Maintenance Director, GPA

January 2017, Volume XIV, Happy New Year – 2017 – GPA

January 2017, Volume XIV

Happy New Year – 2017 – GPA

It is a new year and time to look forward.  Hope yours is a good one.

Membership

Well we closed out 2016 with 924 members.

Small World

When I first moved to Cincinnati back in the 90’s, I met a wide circle of pilots and friends. This last October while on vacation, imagine my surprise when I ran into one of them now living on Maui, Hawaii. It was nice to regain this contact. Truly a small world, but I would not want to paint it.

Website

We have recently added the Cleveland Brake manuals under the ‘Info’ tab. We have also added more of the Grumman airframe manuals as well. More to come.

There is also a new inspection ‘Annual.pdf’ in manuals.

Finally, Ned Thomas pointed out that the links to the Tiger Propeller TCDS(S) (Type Certificate Data Sheet) were bad. We have fixed this and added the TCDS for the MT propeller as well. Enjoy!

Grumman Channel

We heard last month from Freddie Kokaska, son of Fred Kokaska, who wrote and thanked us for the video of his father talking about his 6-cylinder Tiger project. He was able to see his dad in his element, entertaining a crowd. We are happy that he found this video in a web search.

Rigging Tools

The rigging tool project, our Critical Project 1, is now complete. Nothing like a leap of faith to throw 18,000 dollars of rigging tools into the mail hoping you will be paid. Luckily, we live in a small Grumman world.

We would like to thank all who helped by buying sets and support the fleet.

Our next project is to make the DE 5005-502 (AA1C only Elevator Rigging Tool) and the ST 1064 canopy track-sizing tool.   We figure 25 or so of those will be needed, rigging tool set owner will get first crack at them and we are making a few extras.

We are also making a few more of the bearing sizing tools and the aileron bullets.

Details will be coming, here and the Grumman Gang.

The ‘Pre-Purchase’

Now every one is different, but I just had one that will be memorable.

It involved an AA1C. This particular one has a O-320 (HC STC) and a Powerflow (STC). Even with a 64 inch pitched prop it was quite a performer!

When I was first contacted about this plane, I was directed to the Barnstormers ad which right above it had a big warning about this plane. Mainly the complaint was about lost logs and a lien on the plane.

As it happens, the logs of the early days were missing, but there is no time-limited part on a AA1C. All the logs from the new engine conversion and forward were there, including the aux fuel system.

The lien issue was a paperwork error and the wording a bit strange, but the lien letter in the records was actually a lien release.

On top of that, a GPA member who holds 4 maintenance ratings had owned it for a number of years. This plane was the cleanest I have ever seen.

After replacing all the fuel and oil hoses with lifetime ones, it was ready for it’s new home. So the new owner flew up, got checked out by a GPA instructor, signed off and flew the plane home over the next two days. Good to see the plane staying in the GPA.

Many folks are finding the GPA is a great way to find or sell your new plane.

Flight of ‘Fancy’

One of our members has discovered a new flying passion, Pilots and Paws. Joe Campbell of Roanoke, VA, has been getting a great deal of satisfaction using his Cheetah to move dogs about. Puts a smile on his face and many others. He recently took part in the return of a stolen dog, named Fancy. Details here in the local paper.

http://www.al.com/news/anniston-gadsden/index.ssf/2016/09/flight_of_fancy_heflin_dog_mak.html

Pilots and Paws is a tax-deductible service.

Minor Alteration

The advice from the Curt Cowly at PDX FSDO (as part of his seminar  “Maintaining
Your Antique Airplane”), is if you, the mechanic deem the alteration is minor
per Part 43, then log it as such, being sure to have that phrase “I have
determined that this is a minor alteration in accordance with
14CFR Part 43, Appendix A.” included.

Without the phrase, an inspector can see the change, and decide to make it an
administrative hell, requiring you to explain after the fact why the alteration
isn’t “major”. But with the phrase, the responsibility to prove that the
alteration isn’t minor falls to the inspector, and unless you’re claiming one of
the specified major alterations listed in part 43 as a minor alteration, they’re
going to leave well enough alone because they have better things to do.

Secret Rusted Nut Remover

It may sound funny, but a mix of ‘Acetone and ATF’ 50/50 will free up stuff that has been frozen for year. Give it a try!
Forum Post

Lycoming Dry Tappet Clearance

Posted on December 29th, 2016 by Roscoe Rosché

Lycoming states in SI1193A that the dry tappet clearance of our engines is 0.028 to 0.080 inches.  Easy enough to measure. Lycoming makes 4 pushrods for the O-360-A4K as follows: Push Rod Part Number   Superseded P/N  Nominal Length 15F19957-34              73434     12.483 inches 15F19957-35              73435     12.510 inches 15F19957-36              73436     12.537 inches 15F19957-37              73437   Read more


Humor

You Might Be A Redneck Pilot If …

Your stall warning plays Dixie.

Your cross-country flight plan uses Flea Markets as checkpoints.

You think sectional should show trailer parks.

You have mud flaps on your wheel pants.

You only fly out of the pattern to check where your buddies really out their deer stands.

Your toothpick keeps poling your mike.

You constantly confuse Beechcraft with Beechnut.

Just before impact you are heard saying, “Hey Ya’ll Watch This!”

You have a black airplane with a big #3 on the side.

You just taxied around drinking beer.

You use a Purina feed sack as a windsock.

You refer to formation flying as “We got ourselves a convoy.”

Your matching luggage set comes from Piggly Wiggley.

You wouldn’t be caught dead flying a Yankee.

You subscribe to Trade-A-Plane because of the soft paper.

 

The FLY-IN

1:00 am          Alarm clock rings.
2:00 am          EAA members arrive and drag you out of bed.
2:30 am          Throw everything except kitchen sink into pickup.
3:00am           Leave for airport.
3:15 am          Drive back home to get kitchen sink.
3:30 am          Drive like hell to get to airport before daylight.
4:00 am          Set up kitchen. Forgot the damn tarp.
4:30 am          Head for Port-A-Potty.
6:05 am          See eight planes coming in.
6:06 am          Run like hell to kitchen for radio/
6:07 am          Planes overfly field and go away.
6:08 am          Grab radio and take it to Port-A-Potty.
8:00 am          Head back to kitchen.
9:00 am          Still looking for parking area for cars.
10:00 am       Realize you don’t know where to park cars.
NOON             Call on your radio for parking help – eat lukewarm burger on stale bun.
12:15 pm       Run out of toilet paper – eight planes come back.
12:20 pm       Strange feeling in stomach.
12:30 pm       Realize you ate burger from late year.
12:45 pm       Parking help arrives.
12:55 pm       Rushed to hospital to have stomach pumped.
3:00 pm         Arrive back at airport.
4:00 pm         Return to kitchen for another radio battery.
4:01 pm         Check radio – head for taxiway
5:00 pm         Realize that now you are sunburned.
6:00 pm         Arrive at kitchen – see everyone drinking cold beer.
6:01 pm         Scream at everyone with beer.
6:02 pm         Curse Airport Manager.
6:03 pm         Turn to see Airport Manager behind you!
6:05 pm         Find out after scolding, no more cold beer.
6:06 pm         Repress desire to shoot EAA members.
6:07 pm         Lean against BBQ pit.
6:10 pm         Change clothes, throw burned ones in fire.
6:15 pm         Start swatting mosquitos.
6:30 pm         Start teardown.
8:30 pm         Teardown complete, look for beer.
9:30 pm         Promise yourself, Next year to Stay Home!

October 20, 2016, Volume XIII

Website

Cover Image and Profile Photo

You can upload an cover image that is larger than 890px wide, and 225px tall or a profile photo (400 by 400) to replace the generic ones that are on your account when it is approved.  Click on your profile photo to see the options.  Instructions are also in the FAG.

Rigging Tools

The tool will all be back next week from plating and will be shipped to me first part of November.  I will then know the price and be contacting all for payment and to verify shipping addresses.  All 20 set are sold and there is one on the waiting list.  Expected weight of each set in under 20 pounds.

One set is going to Brisbane, Australia, so planes down there will have access to a set for their planes.

Membership

Current membership stands a 869 now making us the largest Grumman Type club.  Good Job All!

“LOU’s TRAVELER TIPS” — for October 2016

By Lou Evans, ATP/CFI/CFII/CFMEI

Flying the Traffic Pattern – Part I”

In this month’s column I am going to focus on how I fly our Grumman aircraft within a typical landing pattern. Of course, most of you who own or have flown a Grumman single, have your own set of techniques that you use while flying in the pattern. However, for those of you new to our brand of airplane, or who may be looking for ways to improve your pattern work — then this writing may be of help to you.

Let me start by saying that as a general rule, I strive to fly each pattern essentially the same way. From the lateral checkpoints, altitude changes, airspeed changes, flap configurations, etc., regardless of the type single-engine Grumman that I fly, I essentially fly the pattern the same way. What I change from day-to-day and model-to-model is the pattern entry point, direction and altitude (airport dependent) as well as the amount of power I use to achieve my performance targets.

Why is this? Because, it is easier and simpler. Especially, with proficiency. As Forrest Gump once said,

“I am not a smart pilot, but I do know and respect what Vref is.”

Ok, maybe he didn’t say that.

Nevertheless, I have always believed that Grumman’s intent was to develop a line of personal aircraft that would make it simple for a student pilot learning to fly in the AA-1 series, to easily move up to their AA-5 series. Ever notice how strikingly similar things are between the 2-place and 4-place lines of aircraft? Notably, their respective systems, nomenclature, panel, checklists, procedures, etc.? I believe they were mutually developed in order to promote familiarity, safety, and of course, to sell airplanes.

Thus, I believe that it makes good sense for us to also keep things simple and similar whenever we fly our birds. Especially, if you regularly fly both the AA-1 and AA-5 series in busy traffic patterns, like I do. Owning and operating both an AA-1C and an AA-5, has made me more cognizant of both the differences and similarities between the two lines of aircraft. Especially, when it pertains to flying in the landing pattern.

Therefore, I have devised a mnemonic to remember what I believe are the EIGHT pillars of commonality for flying any single-engine Grumman aircraft in the landing pattern. This easy-to-remember mnemonic is simply – “WINDSOCK:”

  1. (W)IND: Be Mindful of the WIND During All Phases of the Pattern.
  2. (I)NDICATIOR: Confirm the FLAP INDICATOR After Selecting Flaps.
  3. (N)OSEWHEEL: The NOSEWHEEL is for Steering, not Landing.
  4. (D)ON’T: DON’T Use Flaps for Takeoff.
  5. (S)PEED: Maintain a Safe Flying SPEED (Not too much, not too little).
  6. (O)VER-CORRECT: Don’t OVER-CORRECT [Cross-control] the Aircraft, Especially turning at Low Altitude.
  7. (C)ENTERED: Keep the Ball CENTERED. Always, Always, Always, “hawk the ball.”
  8. (K)ILL: Don’t close out (KILL) the Power Until Landing is Assured.

Adopting the aforementioned considerations when flying the pattern should largely keep you out of trouble. As most of us know, our aircraft do not handle like a Cessna, Piper, etc., especially, in the pattern. That’s mostly due to the wing design of our aircraft being significantly different than those on other aircraft. Especially, in regard to the flaps, as they largely produce drag when deployed, not lift. Our aircraft are also pound-for-pound “cleaner” in design, therefore speed control is imperative.

Therefore, it is imperative that you endeavor to fly a stabilized, power-on approach, each time. Of course, in the case of an engine failure, your options then become limited, and you will need to tailor your approach to landing as circumstances warrant. We’ll save that discussion for another column. But, for now, let’s just say that you will find that your approach to landings will become more manageable and smoother if you maintain a constant relative power-to-airspeed-to-descent ratio while descending from pattern altitude.

I like to think of the landing pattern as not only the means by which I get the airplane on the ground, but also the realm by which I safely transition it from clean flight to a full-stop clear of the runway. In other words, the landing phase doesn’t cease when I touch down on the runway. Rather, for me, the landing phase is over only after I have safely decelerated and taxied clear of the runway and safely completing the After-Landing Checklist.

Whichever manner you choose to fly the landing pattern in our line of aircraft, do remember this — the traffic pattern is historically where most fatal Grumman accidents occur. Why? It is largely because in this phase of flight that most Grumman pilots neglect to account for some, if not all, ital considerations that comprise my humble mnemonic — “WINDSOCK”.

In more direct terms, they most likely become too complacent while flying our line of machines.

As to the specific procedures I use while flying in the pattern, I shall save them for the next segment on this topic, which shall be published in the next GPA Newsletter. Again, my insights and techniques here are merely my own, and ultimately it is up to you to decide if they work for you. As always, one should always first and foremost, reference and abide by your respective Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH) when operating your airplane. During accident/incident investigations, one of the key things the FAA and the NTSB look at is “how” did you operate the aircraft at the time of the accident/incident.

Remember, techniques should augment proper published procedures, not replace or contradict them.

Thus, the key takeaways from today’s discussion should be that our airplanes are unique in the way they handle — especially in the traffic pattern – and that we should always be keenly aware of our aircraft’s location, altitude, attitude and configuration throughout all phases of flight, but especially during takeoffs and landings.

Lastly, by learning, implementing, developing and sustaining a safe and consistent set of procedures/techniques for every realm of flight, you inherently decrease risk and conversely increase safety. This is especially true in the landing pattern.

We all put a lot of time, money and effort into maintaining and up keeping our airplanes. This is largely why the GPA’s membership continues to grow, because we are a collective resource of passionate Grumman aircraft owners. However, what’s the point of doing so, if we then don’t strive to fly prudently and safely each and every time and subsequently end up in an accident?

Sooner or later, the odds catch up with those who don’t.

As we break for now during this discussion of flying the landing pattern, let me leave you with a long-standing aviation adage that I first learned of as a student pilot, 42 years ago. I first saw it on an aviation poster that was tacked up on a wall in the flight school I was learning to fly at in Miami.

Today, this same poster (in smaller form) sits in a framed picture on my hangar desk, and it serves as a personal reminder to fly safe and smart each and every time I go flying. The picture shows an old Curtiss Jenny biplane crashed and mangled into a tall sparse tree. Next to the picture it reads:

“Aviation in itself, is not inherently dangerous. However, to a greater degree than the sea, it is terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect.”

No matter what brand or kind of airplane you fly, in my humble opinion, there is no greater truth in aviation than this. As a long-time Grumman owner, I find it apropos to operating our line of aircraft and especially so, during the critical realms of takeoffs and landings.

Stay frosty and fly safe.

— Lou

NEXT GPA NEWSLETTER TOPIC: “Flying the Traffic Pattern – Part II”

Questions? Comments? I may be reached directly at flyevansaviation@yahoo.com.

Member in the News

Aaron – First Solo

Aaron just had his first solo in his Grumman Traveler, serial number 6.  Aaron realized that he was going to like flying and bought his first plane prior to solo.  As least his seat stays in the same place between flights.

He was not happy with the quality of the rental fleet and decided to save money on his own plane.  I wish I had had that insight before I started flying.  After getting my fist plane, my rental costs were 40% of the asking price of my first Traveler.

Congratulations Aaron!

YouTube Channel – Grumman Pilots

First Full Length Film

The first full length film was Wing Repair Bird Strike where the AA1 series plane suffered a goose strike and crumpled a wing.  Thanks to Ken Blackman for the raw video via DVD.

Films

Since the first film we threw a bunch up and since then have combined all the multiple part (with the exception of Tooling 1996) videos into one movie.  We even started adding into and credits and our last video is about Fred Kokaska talking his long road to getting his 6-cylindser tiger approved.  There will be more.

Subscribe to the Channel

We ask that you subscribe to ‘Grumman Pilots’ which does a number of things.  After 100 people subscribing, we can get a custom group URL to make us easier to find, and you will get updates as new films come out.

Forums

Forums are now available to all members on all the pages. This last week we had the following great additions:

Pulling A Nose Strut out of the Torque Tube Receiver

Posted on October 7th, 2016 by Roscoe Rosché

Our landing gear, especially the nose, is dead simple to compared to other aircraft, but it does need to be serviced properly once in a while.  Some shops do them every 2 years if the plane is out of doors, and every 3 for a hangared bird. When they are not serviced in enough years, Read more


Make your own Landing Light Lenses

Posted on August 21st, 2016 by Ed Muccio

Making lenses for Tiger landing light is simple and produces a much better result at a much lower cost than purchased lenses….see the attached pdf for the HOW TO


Sunset Flight

Posted on October 17th, 2016 by Roscoe Rosché

Got to fly today, it was late in the day since I needed a second ship to  examine the plane in flight to check everything and while heading back got the chance to shoot the chase plane off the left wing against the sun.  My thanks to the original ‘Shop Monkey‘ Matt for helping. Shot Read more


This small sampling is just to tease you. Log in and come on in and read and post your issues, or help others with theirs. This is what community is all about.

Suggestions

As always suggestions and comments are welcome.

History Page (info->History)

We have another new page on the website.  Under the Info tab you will see, ‘History’, a page that will be expanded but currently we have a copy of a 1974 Grumman American Dealer meeting (19 pages).  Enjoy!

Insurance program

Initial work is being done with the help of Norris and Viviane Hibbler to set up an insurance program for the GPA.  Stay tuned for more details.

Humor

‘Doing a Job Alone’

Dear Sir:

I am writing in response to your request for additional information in Block #3 of the accident reporting form. I put ‘Poor Planning’ as the cause of my accident. You asked for a fuller explanation and I trust the following details will be sufficient.

I am a bricklayer by trade. On the day of the accident, I was working alone on the roof of a new six-story building. When I completed my work, I found I had some bricks left over when weighed later were found to weigh 240 lbs. Rather than carry the bricks down by hand, I decided to lower then in a barrel by using a pulley, which was attached to the side of the building at the sixth floor.

Securing the rope at ground level, I went up to the roof, swung the barrel out and loaded the bricks into it. Then I went down and untied the rope, holding it tightly to insure a slow descent of the 240 lbs of bricks. You will notice on the accident reporting form that my weight is 135 lbs.

Due to my surprise at being jerked off the ground so suddenly, I lost my presence of mind and forgot to let go of the rope. Needless to say, I proceeded at a rapid rate up the side of the building.

In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel, which was now proceeding downward at an equally impressive speed. This explains the fractured skull, minor abrasions and the broken collarbone, as listed in Section 3 of the accident reporting form.

Slowed only slightly, I continued my rapid ascent, not stopping until the fingers of my right hand were two knuckles deep into the pulley, which I mentioned in Paragraph 2 of this correspondence. Fortunately by the time I had regained my presence of mind and was able to hold tightly to the rope, in spite of the excoriating pain I was not beginning to experience.

At approximately the same time, however, the barrel of bricks hit the ground, and the bottom fell out of the barrel. Now devoid of the weight of the bricks, the barrel weighed approximately 50 lbs. I refer you again to my weight.

As you might imagine, I began a rapid descent down the side of the building. In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel coming up. This accounts for the two fractured ankles, broken tooth and severe lacerations of my legs and lower body.

Here my luck began to change slightly. The encounter with the barrel seemed to slow me enough to lessen my injuries when I fell into the pile of bricks and fortunately only three vertebrae were cracked.

I am sorry to report, however, as I lay there on the pile of bricks, in pain, unable to move and watching the empty barrel six stories above me, I again lost my composure and presence of mind and let go of the rope.

Wanted Tiger
Just curious if you knew of any clean 77-79 tigers for sale?   muddyls1@gmail.com
Jeff Brown

 

 

You Tube Channel

September 6, 2016 Volume XII

Lou Evans – Fire Award

The first order of business in this newsletter is to let you know that last month, I left Lou Evans off the Fire Award list.  My apologies to Lou and my congratulations.  Lou is a great asset to the GPA.  Here is just one of the reasons why.

Traveler Tips: Volume 1
by Lou Evans

Greetings and Salutations,

My name is Lou Evans and like many of you, I am a proud Grumman aircraft owner and enthusiast who is very excited to be a part of our growing Grumman Pilots Association (GPA) Family.

Recently, Roscoe Rosche’ asked me if I would be willing to step up and serve our club as a conduit of support IRT the aspect of flying our Grumman aircraft, and I have agreed to do so.

It is our collective intent that while serving in this new capacity, I am able to share with you some helpful tips and techniques as to best operate our type airplanes.

This regular column, will be one of the tools I will use to share with you my experiences and insight, as well as a means for you to share your lessons learned, as it relates to an upcoming topic about our airplanes. Specifically speaking, this column will be where I can give you my practices and insight on a range of operational topics, as well as to include select submissions by you, the reader, as to your supporting experiences and lessons learned.

As background data, I have been flying for 42 years that includes 21 years of service as a U.S. Navy P-3C/C-130 Aircraft Commander/Instructor Pilot, 34 years as a CFI, and at present eight years as an active B-737 airline pilot.

I am also, a 16-year owner/operator of a 1977 Grumman American AA-1C “T-Cat” and recently, my wife Dena, my daughter Brittany and I, recently added a 1975 AA-5 Traveler, to our Grumman home. Hence, the “Traveler” name for this column.

It is mainly from my Grumman experiences, that I want to humbly draw from IRT helping you operate our brand of airplanes. I personally, am a better owner and pilot, largely from the tips and techniques others have kindly shared with me. My intent here, is to now “pay it forward.”

Indeed, there are many distinct characteristics and operational considerations about our planes that warrant emphasizing, from both safety and economy standpoints. Thus, it is my hope that this column will be one of both interest and enlightenment to you, as you enjoy our wonderful brand of aircraft…Grumman.

Thank you, for allowing me the honor to do this for you.

I may be reached at flyevansaviation@yahoo.com.

Yours, In Grumman Flight,

— Lou

NEXT GPA NEWSLETTER TOPIC: “Flying the Traffic Pattern”