November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

October 31, 2017, Volume XXII

Happy Halloween GPA!

No tricks, but here are some treats!

Videos

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

434 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 39 this last month bringing total to 392
Views 10,908 last 28 days with a total of 62,655 views.
Watch time 46,730 minutes for the last 28 days.

New Video Formats

There are a couple of new types of videos that we have tried. One uses the Savvy maintenance data display to show engine-operating levels such as CHT, Fuel Flow, and RPM. In other videos we use still and text panels to carry the message.

Keep the suggestions coming.

Membership

1252 Members as of this newsletter.

One member has sold his Tiger so we lost one, but we got another the same day.

Forum Posts

Delamination on trailing edge of wing

Posted on October 31st, 2017 by Randy Norris

My 75 Traveler has several 4” to 10” long delaminated areas on the top and bottom of the trailing edge of the wing & horizontal stabilizer. I have found the SK125A paper, but it seems to just addres the ailerons. Am i misinterpreting this and the rivet protocol is what I HAVE to do, or Read more


Not sure where to ask this

Posted on October 29th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Not sure where to ask this

So for the last month I have owned a 1979 tiger and I couldn’t be happier. The only problem is getting it back into the hanger and it was a bear to push. So I set up a winch that Pulls backwards from the front. Not my design OK clearly stole it from someone else Read more


Canopy cleaning

Posted on October 29th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

What is the consensus on the best product to clean the canopy? And is it actually plexiglass or is it real glass?


There is a YouTube video covering plastic products, ‘LP Plastic Window Polishes – Grumman Style’, Enjoy!

Airplane Prices

One of the things that the GPA helps people with is finding their own Grumman.  So we have a fairly good idea of the price of the planes that are selling.  We do also see the same birds over and over.

Prices are up right now on Grummans so there are a lot of planes on the market that have been sitting for awhile with brand new price tags.  Shop with care and be sure and demand a good pre-purchase from a knowledgeable Grumman shop.

September 27, 2017 – Volume XXII,

Trio Autopilot

Just a quick reminder that if you are interested in a Trio autopilot (roll steering and altitude hold) that the expected price is $8,000 and the delivery time frame if 25 Grumman owners are interested is prior to end of 2017.  Paul is actually shooting for late November.

For those who choose to wait, it may be over a year before they circle back to making install kits again for the Grummans.

Ken Blackman, Dave Fletcher and Roscoe are working with them for a hell-hole (under the rear seat) install of both servo for a quick and clean installation.

Just wanted everyone to know about it so there will be no hard feeling for those left out.  I know of 4 owners who have sent their money as oi this writing.

Send your check for $2,000.00 USD to:

The STC Group
3168 Jacinto Avenue
Simi Valley, CA 93063

also send the following:

Your Name
Aircraft Type
Serial Number
Registration Number
System Voltage
Panel mount or round-hole mount

Stay tuned for the findings.

September 20, 2017, Volume XXI

Well fall will be upon us tomorrow, here is a bit of news to help you pass the time until then.

Videos

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

347 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 31 this last month bringing total to 338
Views 7,102 last 28 days with a total of 47,557 views.
Watch time 38,222 minutes for the last 28 days.

New Video Formats

There are a couple of new types of videos that we have tried. One uses the Savvy maintenance data display to show engine-operating levels such as CHT, Fuel Flow, and RPM. In other videos we use still and text panels to carry the message.

Keep the suggestions coming.

New Grumman Shop

There is a new Grumman shop on the east coast, “Mid Atlantic Yankee Aviation” located at Eagle’s Nest (31E) run by Jimmy Candeletti.

Membership

1212 Members as of this newsletter.

One member has sold his Tiger so we lost one, but we got another the same day.

Forum Posts

Starter Issues

Posted on August 24th, 2017 by Pat

We have been experiencing a starting problem since the middle of the summer. Pushing the start button we hear the new starter relay (changed out yesterday) engage with a good snap but the starter doesn’t engage with the fly wheel. The only sound when pressing the start button is the relay snap. Is my next Read more


Is this ok?

Posted on August 25th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Is this ok?

I have found a Grumman tiger that I have fallen in love with. It has about 590 hours SMOH age. I was there when they run a compression check and they were all at about 77. Then they cut open the oil filter and they found this. I am being told this is completely normal. Read more


Fuel Sump Rust?

Posted on June 30th, 2017 by Peter B

Fuel Sump Rust?

Can anyone shed some light on to what is causing this rust? I appreciate it! (see pic attached)


Events and Gatherings

Red Steward – Rained out

Eclipse – Awesome

Independence – Good turnout

Treo Autopilot STC

For those interested in one of the new autopilots, if we can get 30 Grumman owners to commit, we can each save $1,000.00 off of the Autopilot STC Price. That would be $7,000 for each of us. Contact Gwena Odum, (805) 624-1516 to put your name on the list. They are asking for a $2,000 deposit and hope to have this all done by April. Give them a call, as they need 25 folks to push our planes ahead in the line of airframes.

Cheap Planes

First rule of aircraft buying, always buy the best plane you can afford.

Case in point, one member bought a derelict plane that had sat for 20 years and he thought he was getting a good deal at buying it for $10,000.  First thing he did was put a new Lycoming engine on the plane which set him back $42,000 for the engine and the labor.  His old engine was not a worthy core.

So with faded and peeling original paint, corrosion on the surface skin, broken plastic, original worn interior and carpets and no avionics he had over $55,000 in a plane he could have sold for mid to low-thirties.

So buy the best plane you can afford and get a good pre-purchase from someone who know Grummans.

Magazine Articles

We have 42 articles from 1967 to August of 2017 talking about our line of aircraft. They can be found under INFO -> MAGAZINE ARTICLES.

Across the USA

Neal Coyle (one of our very early members) is relocating from South Carolina to Medford, OR and is taking 2 weeks to zig-zag across the US at 2500 MSL and see the sights. Look for him and N430BS at an airport near you.

Humor

With all the talk of AI (artificial intelligence) and self driving cars these days, I would like to that Gene T for reminding me of a computer joke from the 1960’s.

Folks are on an airliners and the cabin system comes on and announces that the plane will under computer control for the entire flight and there fore much safer than in human hands. The computer voice let folks know of the route, cruising altitude and finally let them know how safe they will be during the flight. As a final bit of encouragement the computer says, “Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong. . .”

Compression Test

Airplane was recently in for annual when one cylinder was at 52 when all the others were at 76. The cylinder was leaking past the intake. Owner was a bit concerned but the intake in not a critical area like the exhaust. So the plane was pulled out and run for a few minutes at fairly high power and then shutdown. Reading after that was 75.

September 1, 2017 Volume XX

What has your GPA done for you lately.

On the way to Oshkosh, helped an owner trouble shoot and then get his plane started to compete the trip.

Plane landed at Oshkosh and owner found Jimmy Candeletti who saw that the seat back hardware had worn and fallen out. A new packet of hardware including the bushing was put together and sent up to Oshkosh so it could be flown home.

Videos

335
Subscribers 46 this last month bringing total to 320
Views 12,657 last 28 days with a total of 43,109 views.
Watch time is 39,555 minutes for the last 28 days.

Membership

1199 Members 49 since last month

TIGER SPINNER BACKPLATE PUNCH-OUT

One of the subjects covered and demonstrated at the June Wrench Bending Weekend was one of the most common screw-ups made in maintenance of our airplanes. It only affects Tigers but that is a large chunk of our fleet. I have made the statement many times, and I will again, that if you line up any random 50 tigers and pull the props, you will find at least half or more of them with damaged aft bulkheads for the spinner. Since I doubt there are any active AA-5Bs out there still using the original light walled spinner with the plastic forward bulkhead, and the same parts are on all AG-5Bs, this is a pretty huge problem. It has been ongoing since late 1979 when the “heavy duty” spinner (Service Kit No. SK-143-2) became available. The spinner re-design came about because of chronic cracking of the spinners and bulkheads of the original design. The AA-5 / -5A version of it, SK-143-1 was also introduced at the same time but does not share the problem with the Tigers because of one big difference in the propeller drive bushings of the O-320 engine vs. the O-360 A4K in all Tigers (save about 4 or 5 that have been converted to larger engines) and this will be discussed here.

First, the propeller drive bushings are the things pressed into the crankshaft flange that protrude through the starter ring gear support and are intended to penetrate into the counterbores of the propeller spacer (or prop hub if no spacer is installed) which is not the case here. Where most engines have the same length bushing in all 6 positions, the –A4K is different by having two of them much shorter and the other 4 are pretty short compared to the very similar engine in the Piper Archer, the –A4M. That model O-360 engine has about ¼” longer ones in all 6 holes. Remember that one of these bushings has an enlarged step or flange to index the ring gear support for timing the engine. In the case of the –A4K, in the Tiger, this happens to be one of the two extra short ones which kind of complicates the situation.

Now, what happens when the backplate of the spinner kit is installed, the longer 4 bushings barely protrude enough through it to penetrate into the counterbores of the spacer. The two short ones do not come through the support at all thus not engaging the backplate at all. It’s very easy for the backplate to slip off these slightly protruding bushings and rest on the propeller bolts. When the prop is forced onto the bushings by tightening the bolts, the edges of the bushings cut the holes out oblong in 4 of the 6 positions. Evidence of this is thin crescent shapes of aluminum shoved into the counterbores of the spacer. The maintenance manual (1983 revision) for the AA-5B tells you to tape the backplate to the nose cowl to hold it while you install the prop. Yeah, right, and probably rip off some paint when it is removed. There is no guaranteed this will prevent the following from happening, however, so I like to have one person firmly hold the aft bulkhead in place while another or two install the prop and snug up two bolts. This does take extra personnel and someone trying to install the prop solo is running a very good chance of doing serious, expensive damage. Please don’t attempt it!

To carry this on another step, should the installer not realize he has made a mistake and corrected it, and attempts to install the spinner he will find it doesn’t want to line up with all the 22 screw holes. Taking an awl and forcing the issue will probably egg out the holes and put stress on the bulkheads resulting in cracks. The spinner will wobble as the backplate will be moving in a concentric pattern and the point will bob up and down somewhat. There will also be a vibration result. If the prop is removed and the installation is corrected, it will be difficult to get all the holes exactly in the right place to perfectly align with the drive bushings. If you rotate the backplate 90 degrees (two sets of holes) counterclockwise (looking back across the engine) you can set the two holes that are not punched out over two of the longer bushings, and attain proper position. This will not allow the prop to be installed in the same position as it was, or as the maintenance manual describes, but is legal to do. I have seen it actually operate smoother in the alternate position on a few airplanes.

So if you have a Tiger, especially if you do not have a split nose cowl, discuss this potential problem with your mechanic BEFORE the propeller is removed for any reason. That back bulkhead costs nearly 500 bucks, if it is available when you need one. The front one is pushing $300 and they are currently on about a 6 month back order due to tooling problems. The TCB Composites STC’d alternative is about $500. One option is to install the -A4M’s longer drive bushings in place of the two shorter ones (approved on Air Mods N.W.’s Sensenich Propeller STC SA4387NM), which practically eliminates the chance for potential damage.

For consultation on this subject, feel free to contact me and I will discuss it and your particular situation directly.

Ken Blackman
425-334-3030
guru@airmodsnw.com

July 13, 2017 Volume XIX

Propellers

Here is a new spin on propellers.  We recently bought a new Sensenich Propeller from Fletchair that was stamped 61 but turned out to be a 60.  Sent it back and had it adjusted.

One of our members has an AA1B with a 160 HP engine and his engine shakes.  Even after dynamically balancing it still shook badly at certain RPMs.  Finally took it off the plane and send it to a prop shop.  It was in static balance (equal weight blade-to-blade), but the profile was off due to one blade having 3 coats of paint and the other several more, thus creating a different airfoil.  Propeller was stripped and overhauled and now is smooth as silk.

Finally when it comes to Dynamically balancing a prop, the ring gear has holes that are at 5.5 inches from the center.  SInce prop balancing assume weight at a one-foot radius, 5.5 inches is only 0.458333 of the way there.  So devide your test weight by this to get the real weight to add.  FYI.  Theory, 5.5/12 = 0.458333

YouTube Videos

Last month we had 259 videos, many added each night during the Wrench and Elbow Bending, and more during the National Gathering.  We now have (298)

Subscribers 23 this last month bringing total to 274

Views 5535 last 28 days with a total of 30, 446 views.

Watch time is 28,000 minutes for the last 28 days.

Tools for Sale

Here are the new sets of tools available.

Jack Pads – eBay search for Grumman Jack Pad, around 27 USD.

AA1C – $35

AMOC – $15

Track Sizing Tool -$65

Bearing Sizing Tool – $50

Aileron Bullet -$25

Membership

1152 Members 34 since last month

 

3rd Wrench and Elbow Bending

Friday started with canopy track and rail maintenance on Mark and Kelly Matthews 75 Tiger. Lunch was prepared and cooked by the girls in attendance. Videos were posted each night instead of Daily Coverage.

Saturday we saw a wet vacuum pump installed replacing the dry vacuum pump. Formation flying seminar was held and then a practice flight.

Sunday More formation flying and finishing up on the maintenance issues.

BBQ Hangar Party kicked off about 6 pm with live music from Nitro and Partner, Nitro was a former Cheetah Pilot and Owner 20 years ago.

4th National Gathering

Monday – Tour of Jungle Jim’s International Market

Tuesday – Afternoon Seminar by Mike K of ElectroAir Electronic Systems.

Pool Party, BBQ, and Ice Cream at Shop Monkey’s Place.

Wednesday – Banquet at Alcupolco’s. We saw some departures for weather today.

 

May 23, 2017 Volume XVIII

Membership

If you have visited the home page lately, you have seen we are over 1,100 members (1,101 at the time of writing this.)  Truly not bad for a group turning 3 this July.  Keep spreading the word.

Maintenance

No plane is perfect.  But we can devise a plan to get there from here.  Sit down with your mechanic and make a multi-year plan sop that every year you plane is better.  That way with a well maintained plane, when you are ready to fly, so is you bird!

Wrench & Elbow Bending

Just a bit over two weeks till this event kicks off.  Bring your friends and especially your mechanic to see the special love these birds need.  We cover a lot in just 2 and a half days, but we cannot place it in order after the first item, we just go with the flow.

We tend to end at 5 or so, have a beer and chat about the days with questions and answers.  Then we go out for dinner.

Lots to learn and see and this will probably be the last free such weekends.

National Gathering

Continuing the fun, the wrench and elbow weekend winds down with a late afternoon BBQ, live music and cold drinks.

We are leaving social time in the schedule for folks to meet and chat.  We also want to hear about how your year of flying has been.

GPA is Pet Friendly

We have a member from California who is making a minimum 1741 nm trip (one-way) with ‘Grumman’, his traveling canine.  We look forward to seeing Rich and Grumman again.

Garner

Garner Rice want me to convey to ya’ll that he is living the life of a ‘Gentleman Mower/Handyman’.  He gets up right after dawn, mows, haul away trash, etc., then head home to a shower to remove the dirt, has dinner and goes to bed.  Living the Dream.

Second Set of Rigging Tools

We now have the latest additions to the rigging tool set in house and are boxing them up now.  We had more of the bearing sizing tools made, aileron bullets, AMOC gauge for SI 61-01, a canopy track sizing tool, and the elevator rigging tool for the AA1C.  They will be available until gone, so be sure and see them at the Wrench Bending or National Gathering.  We will be posting prices on the web site shortly.

ElectroAir

Probably one of the biggest bangs for the buck in our planes are the ElectroAir EIS 41000 electronic ignition systems replacing one mag.  These unit fire a 70,000 volt spark across a wider gap High Energy spark plug and advance the spark advance as the engine loads up.  Savings from 0.8 to 1.5 gph can be achieved along with easier starts (yes you can start on the EIS) and cleaner combustion.  You also develop a few more horsepower as well.

We have installed 10 of these units now in Cheetah and Tigers and so far, no one has asked for it to be removed.

Kaye Coates

Kaye Coates, wife of Geoffrey Coates, both of Austrialia and early Founders of the GPA.  Sadly I must tell you that Kaye lost her long battle with cancer on May 22, 2017.  She was a gracious lady with a wonderful view of life and flight.  She will be missed.  Our prayers and condolences to Geoffrey and the rest of the family, relative and extended.

Neil Walker

Neil Walker of Cincinnati, former GE engine designer, lost his battle with cancer quietly among family May 22, 2017.  Neil’s passion for flying machines rubbed off on his son, Martin, who owned a Grumman for a number of years and still has the passion.  Neil was a good friend and wonderful advisor.  He will be missed.  Our sympathies to the family.

Sensenich Propeller

We just had a second Sensenich propeller that was not twisted as marked.  The new prop was stamped 61, but after turning well over red line in flight at altitude, we had it checked and it was a perfect 60.  So it was repitched.  Bob Hodo had one a few years ago also mis-marked.

Tow Bar

We had a member that wanted to share a recent event while flying.  Basically, during preflight, he failed to remove the tow bar from the front fairing.

I lost my tow bar the other day and wanted to share what I learned.

   I’ve attached two pictures of the tow bar and found a tag on it from Redro Inc in Minn.  After I lost the tow bar I searched the runway immediately but did not find it. Today, I discovered the tow bar about 800 feet from the start of take-off roll on the left side of the runway.  Looking over the aircraft, the only evidence of damage was on the right side of the nosewheel pant where the towbar attaches.  If you look closely, you will see some damage on the aft right-side wheel pant hole that I suspect occurred when the tow bar separated after lift-off, but cannot confirm, since I bought my Tiger with numerous blemishes as can be seen from the condition of the nose-wheel pant.  I inspected the entire aircraft and found no damage to anything including the prop.  When I found the tow bar, the only damage was some scraping on the steel ring that I welded onto the tow bar.  The scrape was only found on the bottom of the ring and no propeller contact damage was found.

 

   When I taxied with the tow bar attached, I think the steel ring made it glide with no noticeable noise or control problems.  My suspicion is that on take-off the tow bar rotated downward about the axis of the wheel into a trailing position.  At that point, I think the cross-bar on the tow bar contacted the bottom of the wheel and spread the tow bar enough to detach.  Ken Blackman tells me that his tow bar will NOT come off.  Thankfully this one did or else I suspect I would have suffered far more damage on landing.

 

March 2017 XVI – National Gathering

March 2017 XVI

National Gathering June 2017

Hope everyone had a good Mardi Gras. Well we are just a few days over 3 months till we all meet at KHAO for the Wrench and Elbow Bending (June 9-11) followed immediately by the GPA National Gathering (June 11-15).

Here is information to get you started.

Schedule:

Friday and Saturday
June 9-10, 9am till 5pm Wrench and Elbow Bending on various topics.

Sunday June 11
9am till 3pm Wrench Bending
3pm – 5pm Social time and arrivals
5 pm – Till BBQ and social Mixer

Monday June 12
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 11 am Tour – Jungle Jims International Market
Lunch on own
1pm – 5-pm Airplane Games (or seminars if wx bad)
Dinner on own

Tuesday June 13
6am – 9am Morning Flights
9am – 12 pm Seminars (or games in wx yesterday was bad)
Lunch on own
1pm – 5pm Discussion and Seminars
5pm – 7pm Dinner on own
7pm – 8pm Ice Cream
8pm – 11pm Hangar Party (Hangar flying, etc)

Wednesday June 14
9am – 12 pm Finish Reindeer airplane games
12pm – 2 pm Lunch on own
2pm – 6pm Free time to explore/social time
6pm – 9pm Banquet

Thursday June 15
Departures

Airplane Games (Events)

Spot Parking
Precision Taxi
Rigged Preflight
Rodeo Tiedown
Broken Towbar (Mens and Women)

We will have a First and Second place Trophy for each event

Other Awards
Most Recent Private Pilot
Most Recent Instrument
Most Recent Advanced Rating (Commercial, ATP)
Most Recent Mechanic
People’s Choice Award
Mechanics Award
Fire Awards

Hotels:
Holiday Inn Express Fairfield 3.4 miles
LaQuinta Inn Cincinnati North 4.8 miles
Mariott Courtyard Hamilton 4.7 miles

Discounts: Ask for the ‘Cincinnati Jet Center’ Discount

Rental Cars
Enterprise 513-737-4100 ($45/day)
Hertz 513-870-0745 (Need your Gold Number
Avis 513-860-2254 (Need Wizard Number)

If you are interested in presenting a seminar, please get in touch with us. We have a few planned that we know you will enjoy.

A new T-shirt design is in the works for the event and it will feature a pocket.

We have kept this short and sweet.

Be sure and Book your reservation for the event, we expect the total fee to be $50 for this event which will include the banquet, reception, and the hangar party.

Hope to see you in June, fly safe.

Your GPA