Category Archives: Uncategorized

February 14 2018 Volume XXVII

February 14 2018 Volume XXVII

Happy Valentines Day!

Membership

Currently stands at 1366.

New Admin

Would like to welcome Mark Matthews as a new administrator of the GPA site.

New Author

Curt was recently promoted to author to help him with his posting of forum articles while we refurbishes his Grumman. There were enough good photos in his ports to make a YouTube video of the project. Keep up the good work.

Editors Note: We are trying a new format this issue, in essence a video newsletter of topics that occurred since the last newsletter. Let us know what you think. Suggestions are always welcomed.

Videos

We now have 512 videos in the collection called ‘Grumman Pilots’.

On a related note, what a perfect storm of events did to help out this number and push us over the 500 mark. We had just come home after 3 weeks on the road, got hit by a 30 hour ice, sleet, rain, freezing rain, snow then hard freeze so we just stayed in by the wood stove and produced videos. We hope you enjoy them.

I would also like to thanks two video contributors as well.

First, William Chapman, for his video of rebuilding the master and slave cylinders in his Cheetah/AA5A. Very informative and useful, thank you William.

https://youtu.be/ejaiP-Lv9xQ

Second, Nate Volk, who sent us a medley of his first training flight in his TR2, which he bought for flight training. He soloed on Friday, January 26, 2018. This was also the first day of the Wrench and Elbow bending held at PHOG.

https://youtu.be/JnP4CeFEh7M

See the event for yourself!

 

Here are some of the things we saw at that event.

https://youtu.be/8iUO1lJt5ZU

 

Here is some of the local color on Maui, the best of the islands so they say, Maui no ka oi.

https://youtu.be/Flm7Q8_W3GM

https://youtu.be/A0ppkipjEhE

 

Here are some of the other new videos:

 

Finally, we did another edit on Cheetah Flight to bring it down to be about a minute to serve as the new video on the Grumman Pilots channel home page on YouTube. This video will receive another edit as we morph it in to a new intro for the videos we post on the channel.

 

Maui Reflections

It was nice to spend time with Luann, Mark, Kelly, Ken and Jan and others in a relaxed environment. Ken and I may have talked airplanes a lot, but there is so much he knows that I need to learn, it just happens. Nice trip and ideas that I think you will like as they come out in the next several months. Stay tuned.

Lycoming Engine

We you look at how over engineered these engines really are, you can see that they are almost bulletproof even in extreme conditions. You saw some of the cooling issues with missing baffles, and poor seals in the videos above, yet these engines fly all the time. First you have to look at the normal mission, full throttle to get into the air, and then back to 1900 RPMs as they slowly cruise to the destination, usually within 60 miles. So the engine is putting out very low power and gets adequate cooling for that mission. As Ken says, “Hang Loose’ has a whole new meaning when applied to flying in the islands.

Wrench and Elbow Bending, 7S5 June, 2018

National Gathering/ Wrench & Elbow Bending 7S5

Australia – Care to host an event?

January 17, 2018, Volume XXVI

January 17, 2018, Volume XXVI

Membership

1340 members as of today in 30 countries.

YouTube

Subscribers needed!  Here is why. YouTube has raised the bar for channels to generate revenue. We meet the watch time requirements, but fall short of the new 1,000 subscribers needed. So please, go to our channel and subscribe.   We have until February 20 to reach this new level. Thanks you.

Videos

482 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 646
Views 11,243 last 28 days with a total of 90,828 views.
Watch time 48,806 minutes for the last 28 days.

Forum Posts

N28678 Chronicle

Posted on December 24th, 2017 by Curt

N28678 Chronicle

I’m waiting for my SI Medical. The FAA has had my paperwork and for…10 months – and still not given me a decision. It’s about the most frustrating thing I can imagine. So, I’m trying to make the best of the downtime and chronicle the recent history on my 1977 Tiger. Up to my current Read more


This forum post and one other inspired 2 channel videos, check them out.

 

Rear vent air intake

Posted on October 7th, 2017 by David

I have had complaints in the summer from passengers that the air flow through the rear vents on a newer vintage tiger is quite poor. When I looked with a flashlight inside the vent air intake, I can see a web of thin wood-like mesh overlying what I believe is plastic yellow mesh substrate. I Read more


New Fuselage EmblemsYankee Fuselage Emblem Traveler Fuselage Emblem

The new fuselage emblems are in the company store and they look very nice. Emblems for Tiger, Cheetah, Lynx, Trainer, TR2, and T-Cat are coming. Stay Tuned.

Wrench Bending

Luann and I are off tomorrow to attend the next wrench bending in Hawaii. Ken and Jan are coming along so that the Grummans in the islands can get some love too.

Wrench and Elbow Bending - Kahului, Maui HI

Posted on November 11th, 2017 by Roscoe Rosché

Wrench and Elbow Bending - Kahului, Maui HI

01/26/2018 - 01/28/2018 @ All Day - UPDATE For those attending this weekend, if landing to the north, go to the tower and we are in there t-hangers closest to the tower on the South facing side. There are 15 Grummans in the Hawaiian Islands and this Wrench and Elbow Bending will have the feel of home with an Aloha Friday afternoon [...]


In June we have another Wrench and Elbow Bending along with some social time in Independence, Oregon this June.

National Gathering/ Wrench & Elbow Bending 7S5

Posted on April 21st, 2017 by Roscoe Rosché

National Gathering/ Wrench & Elbow Bending  7S5

06/22/2018 - 06/25/2018 @ All Day - Location is 7S5, Independence, OR. [Preliminary - subject to change - your mileage may vary - objects on schedule are closer than they appear] National Gathering Fly-In June 22-26 This year's national gathering will be held in the Willamette Valley at the Independence State Airpark (7S5) in Independence Oregon. Hosted by Mark and Kelly Matthews [...]


Finally if the schedule holds we will have one late September or early October at Yankee Aviation at KHAO.

Schedule Alert

For those who need Grumman advice, I will be mostly out of contact January 18 to February 9th or so.  Ken will be out of pocket (same pocket) January 20th to February 4 or 5.  FYI.

December 31, 2017 Volume XXV

Happy New Years GPA!

We stand now at 1311 members which is not bad for a 4.5 year old organization.  Thanks for being a part of this endeavor.

We released our latest video 2 days ago, ‘Cheetah Flight‘, made with a new editor for video we are trying.  Please enjoy this wonderful work at:  https://youtu.be/cO2BXhH1aX0

For those of you like Curt,  who is keeping us in the loop on his TIGER REDO (see forum post )

N28678 Chronicle

Posted on December 24th, 2017 by Curt

N28678 Chronicle

I’m waiting for my SI Medical. The FAA has had my paperwork and for…10 months – and still not given me a decision. It’s about the most frustrating thing I can imagine. So, I’m trying to make the best of the downtime and chronicle the recent history on my 1977 Tiger. Up to my current Read more


, send us pictures and a description of what you are doing and we will help all we can with forum postings and videos.

May your New Year be wonderful and filled with flying.

Happy New Year!

December 29, 2017 Volume XXIV

Membership

We are now north of 1300 members keep spreading the word.

This past month, Albert Sieve, Luann’s dad went west. The video ‘End of an Era’ was just part of what we did flying for the navy. Albert and his wife, Goldie, were both Founders of the GPA.

Propellers

Propellers are without dispute the most abused appliances on an airplane. This is the part that literally pulls you through the air and translates all the wonderful power of your engine into motive force. Be sure your is in proper shape.

In 1991 the FAA required all propellers to be given their own logbook and not recorded in the engine or airframe log. Here we are 27 years later and planes still come into the shop with no propeller logbook. Do you have one?

Since last month we have added 3 new propeller videos from Bob Reed. I would like to thank Bob for these videos and the contribution to the GPA.

Videos

Our YouTube channel ‘Grumman Pilots’ was created on August 24, 2016 when we pushed up our first video, the ‘Whelen Orion Tail Strobe’. On October 24, we added the first of many Ken Blackman Videos. On February 10, 2017 we turned on monetization of the videos after completing all the requirements. On that date we had 69 videos already on the channel.

Tell Everyone

457 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51 this last month bringing total to 478
Views 8,548 last 28 days with a total of 81,805 views.
Watch time 41,503 minutes for the last 28 days.

Playlists

We have created several playlists on our channel to help organize our videos. There is also a new link on the channel page, here you can look at videos or playlist just by clicking.

Magnetos (6)
Spark Plugs (7)
Unusual Aircraft (9)
Landing Gear (10)
Baffles and Seals (12)
Flying (15)
Seats (9)
Lighting (8)
Canopy (15)
Fuel Systems (26)
Rivets (7)
Windows (20)
ELT (4)
Powerflow (5)
Brakes (13)
Compasses (4)
Electronic Ignition (12)
Propellers (9)
Restoration Projects (1)

Christmas Movie

As many of you know, when you post a Forum article about one of the topics and you include pictures, we ask that you keep us informed of the project and offer any help we can.

Over the last months we have asked a bunch of folks and finally someone came through. That is how the Christmas Video came to be, Merry Christmas Curt and thanks for sharing your Tiger with us, Happy Holidays All!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC2pguKzEqM

The 31 Maintenance Items that You Can Do

What is Preventative Maintenance?
”Preventive maintenance” means:
simple or minor preservation operations and the replacement of small standard parts not involving complex assembly operations.

The 31 Maintenance Items that You Can Do

Posted on December 29th, 2017 by Roscoe Rosché

The 31 Maintenance Items that You Can Do What is Preventative Maintenance?
”Preventive maintenance” means:
simple or minor preservation operations and the replacement of small standard parts not involving complex assembly operations. The 31 items that you CAN do yourself Removal, installation, and repair of landing gear tires. Replacing elastic shock absorber cords on landing gear. Servicing Read more


The 31 items that you CAN do yourself

  1. Removal, installation, and repair of landing gear tires.
  2. Replacing elastic shock absorber cords on landing gear.
  3. Servicing landing gear shock struts by adding oil, air, or both.
  4. Servicing landing gear wheel bearings, such as cleaning and greasing.
  5. Replacing defective safety wiring or cotter keys.
  6. Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.
  7. Making simple fabric patches not requiring rib stitching or the removal of structural parts or control surfaces. In the case of balloons, the making of small fabric repairs to envelopes (as defined in, and in accordance with, the balloon manufacturers’ instructions) not requiring load tape repair or replacement.
  8. Replenishing hydraulic fluid in the hydraulic reservoir.
  9. Refinishing decorative coating of fuselage, balloon baskets, wings tail group surfaces (excluding balanced control surfaces), fairings, cowlings, landing gear, cabin, or cockpit interior when removal or disassembly of any primary structure or operating system is not required.
  10. Applying preservative or protective material to components where no disassembly of any primary structure or operating system is involved and where such coating is not prohibited or is not contrary to good practices.
  11. Repairing upholstery and decorative furnishings of the cabin, cockpit, or balloon basket interior when the repairing does not require disassembly of any primary structure or operating system or interfere with an operating system or affect the primary structure of the aircraft.
  12. Making small simple repairs to fairings, nonstructural cover plates, cowlings, and small patches and reinforcements not changing the contour so as to interfere with proper air flow.
  13. Replacing side windows where that work does not interfere with the structure or any operating system such as controls, electrical equipment, etc.
  14. Replacing safety belts.
  15. Replacing seats or seat parts with replacement parts approved for the aircraft, not involving disassembly of any primary structure or operating system.
  16. Trouble shooting and repairing broken circuits in landing light wiring circuits.
  17. Replacing bulbs, reflectors, and lenses of position and landing lights.
  18. Replacing wheels and skis where no weight and balance computation is involved.
  19. Replacing any cowling not requiring removal of the propeller or disconnection of flight controls.
  20. Replacing or cleaning spark plugs and setting of spark plug gap clearance.
  21. Replacing any hose connection except hydraulic connections.
  22. Replacing prefabricated fuel lines.
  23. Cleaning or replacing fuel and oil strainers or filter elements.
  24. Replacing and servicing batteries.
  25. Cleaning of balloon burner pilot and main nozzles in accordance with the balloon manufacturer’s instructions.
  26. Replacement or adjustment of nonstructural standard fasteners incidental to operations.
  27. The interchange of balloon baskets and burners on envelopes when the basket or burner is designated as interchangeable in the balloon type certificate data and the baskets and burners are specifically designed for quick removal and installation.
  28. The installations of anti-misfueling devices to reduce the diameter of fuel tank filler openings provided the specific device has been made a part of the aircraft type certificate data by the aircraft manufacturer, the aircraft manufacturer has provided FAA-approved instructions for installation of the specific device, and installation does not involve the disassembly of the existing tank filler opening.
  29. Removing, checking, and replacing magnetic chip detectors.
  30. Removing and replacing self-contained, front instrument panel-mounted navigation and communication devices that employ tray-mounted connectors that connect the unit when the unit is installed into the instrument panel, (excluding automatic flight control systems, transponders and microwave frequency distance measuring equipment (DME)). The approved unit must be designed to be readily and repeatedly removed and replaced, and pertinent instructions must be provided. Prior to the unit’s intended use, an operational check must be performed in accordance with the applicable sections of part 91.
  31. Updating self-contained, front instrument panel-mounted Air Traffic Control (ATC) navigational software data bases (excluding those of automatic flight control systems, transponders and microwave frequency distance measuring equipment (DME), provided no disassembly of the unit is required and pertinent instructions are provided. Prior to the unit’s intended use, an operational check must be performed in accordance with applicable sections of part 91.

November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

November 22, 2017, Volume XXIII

Electronic Ignition Sale

ElectroAir Electronic Ignition System (EIS) is having an end of year sale. From November 1 to December 31, they are knocking $357.00 dollars off the regular price of $3,570.00 for the 4-cylinder install kit.

For those of you interested in an EIS, you may find it hard to find factual data from folks you have installed them on their planes. Here is a bit of what you can expect.

Starting becomes a second blade event, hot or cold.

More aggressive lean and lower fuel burn (safely a gallon an hours less)

Make engine very smooth able to fire lean mixtures during throttle changes.

Install High Energy plugs in the bottom holes and let the mag fire the top plugs. The lower plugs stay clean due to scavenging fire of the plug during exhaust at TDC.

High Altitude operation due to spark advance, up to 40 degrees BTDC to strike piston at 11 degrees past TDC for maximum thrust on piston face.

ICAS

The MTH (Magneto Timing Head) needs to be replaced at engine overhaul.  The spark plug high energy leads need to be replaced every 5 years, and the High-energy spark plugs have a service life of 500 hours.

YouTube Videos

You may have noticed in the latest videos an audio intro starting with ‘Clear Prop.’ I would like to thank Matt Wing for this. A few videos later we added a single engine piston engine flyby as it drones away.

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

443 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 51this last month bringing total to 426
Views 10,554 last 28 days with a total of 69,900 views.
Watch time 47,235 minutes for the last 28 days.

Although the USA get most of the views, it is interesting to see what other countries are watching. These include:

Canada
United Kingdom
Brazil
Libya
Spain
Lithuania
Australia
Germany
Ireland
Poland
Sweden
Singapore
Ukraine
Denmark
France
Hungary
Indonesia
South Korea

We are Working with Bob Reed to import his propeller series of videos into the ‘Grumman Pilots’ Channel, stay tuned for these and the announcement.

We also received our first royalty payment from Google for the videos.  You may also have noticed that we are in 28 countries now, mostly found from the YouTube videos we put out.

Keep the suggestions and requests coming.

Membership

1277 Members as of this newsletter.

Forum Posts

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Posted on November 9th, 2017 by Mike L

78 AA5B, Paint, Interior and Panel

Flew it for awhile after I bought it to check out all the bugs. Then started in on the project a couple of months ago. Original paint had excellent adhesion, it was just faded and worn. Interior was in terrible condition as was the overlay on the panel. Prepped and painted the airplane using and Read more


AMPERAGE GAUGE

Posted on November 13th, 2017 by William Hendrix

Does anyone know where I can get a new or used amp gauge for my 79 AA5B? I can also remove the existing and send to a repair place, but where?


Tiger Decals

Posted on February 10th, 2016 by Steve Siry

Tiger Decals

I am looking for any leads on these decals that are on my Tiger.  I have been informed that they are not the stock ones. Thanks Steven


Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Best Flight instrument ever from Bed Bath and Beyond

So like many of you I have all kinds of digital numbers flashing in my cockpit. That included a digital timer to not let me forget about changing tanks. But I found it to be to “ordinary” and it didn’t really draw my attention to something so important. So I got this online and place Read more


The Dreaded Pre-Purchase, Myths and Mysteries

(Adapted from Bondline.org)

Note:   Buy the bet plane you can afford at the onset. Thinking you will find a bargain project and be able to do a lot of the work yourself and have a great plane at the end of it that you can sell for a profit is a myth. Just buy the best plane you can afford.

There are as many different ideas on the proper scope and depth of a pre-purchase inspection as there are buyers. What makes that interesting is the expectations of those buyers, and how those expectations change after owning a plane for 11 months and having gone through the dreaded “first annual”.

When is it a better time to discover the true condition of the plane, during the purchase process or after the money has changed hands and the plane has flown away? This is the reason it is suggested that a purchaser do a thorough pre-buy and do all that is reasonable to identify things that will later bite him in the wallet. What that means is a full annual inspection by the checklist in the factory maintenance manual — 13 pages for the AA-5x, a few less for the AA-1x.

“But it just had a fresh annual last month and has flown nearly no hours since then.”

Perhaps, but who did the inspection, and did you get a copy of the signed, dated list of discrepancies?

Most planes sell because the owner is moving on. Sometimes it’s to larger or smaller aircraft, but often it’s away from aviation. So what did they tell the mechanic that performed the last annual? Probably something along the lines of: “I’ve got it listed in T-A-P, so don’t spend any money on it that you don’t have to.” That is a pretty sobering thought when you know that you are going to take your family and friends up in your new plane just as soon as you can get it home.

Another factor that enters the discussion is that an “Annual Inspection” is just that, INSPECTION. As in ‘LOOK AT IT.’ No repairs or service work are part of the inspection. And while it’s true that the basic oil, filter, fluid levels and mag timing checks are regularly performed in conjunction with the inspection, that is just a convenience for the owner, since the plane is in the shop, they have it opened up, and most planes haven’t had any service work since LAST year.

So if it’s just been inspected, and no actual work was done to repair or improve the plane, just what did you get? Probably just bare minimum that the FAA requires for the plane to be legally operated. Certainly nothing that says there won’t be any catastrophic failures or even minor items wearing or breaking on the very next flight. The plane was just “looked at”. Maybe sort of a super pre-flight.

There have been many tales on the GG of woe and expense after purchasing a plane, and yet it seems that new buyers never learn, and the same mistakes are repeated again and again.

Lets go over some items that really ought to be checked during the pre-buy inspection on your intended purchase.

Paperwork

As strange as it may seem, the FAA is more focused on the paperwork than they are on the actual components. The reason for this is that if the paperwork is correct, then the physical components can be manipulated to create “Airworthiness”. However if the paperwork is incorrect, then one can not make the plane “Airworthy” because the records that support the airworthiness are incomplete or inaccurate. The FAA takes this to the point that the DATA PLATE is the component they are most interested in, the rest of the airplane or engine are just parts which can be replaced as needed.

One must have the “AR(R)OW” paperwork for flight, and one must have an Airworthiness Certificate to determine that the aircraft in question was EVER in a condition to hold US Certification. Many planes were built and shipped overseas without ever having US paperwork, such as the ones that went directly to Canada that often are brought back to the US later. The price, especially considering the current exchange rates, may be very attractive, but one is left to PROVE to the FAA that the plane conforms to its Type Design and is therefore eligible to have an airworthiness certificate issued.

Logs are an important part of the paperwork. It’s quite common to see planes for sale with some or all of the logs missing. This is a big red flag for the novice buyer. WHY are the logs missing? It could be that they were truly lost or destroyed. It’s possible that the plane was a repossession or transferred in an estate at some time, and the logs were not available to the new owner. Or, a more nefarious possibility, they were intentionally kept back to avoid the documenting of repairs from some unreported accident! Perhaps there were even substandard repairs that included the use of undocumented parts or unapproved repair techniques. Lost logs require an even higher level of due diligence on the part of the inspector and purchaser.

Prop

Props have a TBO, just like engines. When is it due for an OH? Just consult the manufacturer’s data for the prop in question. Most fixed pitch props are due for OH at engine OH, or at any time that they have wear or damage that exceeds the prop manufacturer’s field dressing limits. Props are a “Class 1” appliance in FAA speaks, and that means that they SHOULD have their own log.  Most older planes do not, and this then makes it more difficult to establish the history of that prop. Models such as the McCauley prop used on the 70’s production Tiger have AD mandated inspections every 200 hours. Without a dedicated prop log, where are those entries kept? Usually in the Airframe log, but what if a prop is bought used, did you get the airframe log entries showing past compliance with the AD and an accurate Total Time in Service? Better obtain a $5 prop log and transfer the available history to it, and begin logging inspections and maintenance from here forward.

Airframe

The single largest issue can probably be summed up in one word: Corrosion. As the fleet ages and time takes its toll on our light alloy airframes, oxidation is the number one problem that the fleet faces. The factory engineers never expected that we’d be flying significant portions of the fleet 35 years after production. They built the planes to last 10-15 years, and then expected that we’d scrap them and buy new ones.  If aviation products didn’t go up at over twice the rate of inflation, perhaps that would be the case.  A new $30,000 Tiger?  Sure, where do we mail the check?

Recently there seems to be a rash of planes with corrosion in the center spar. Not some light surface corrosion that might leave little pits in the spar tube, but full blown inter-granular corrosion that was raising bumps on the spar tube. This requires an expensive center spar and many hours of labor to replace it. Not all planes that have this sort of corrosion are “Florida” planes. The corrosion is severe enough on many planes that you have to ask WHEN in the last 20+ years of annual inspections was this overlooked, since it was quite obvious that it hadn’t JUST popped up in the last few months.

Engine

Sellers are very fond of speaking highly of the good running of the engine, even though it’s at or very near TBO. The implication, if not outright spoken statement is that TBO is just a “suggestion” and since THIS engine is running so well, has such fine compression and uses negligible oil between changes, that it’s going to reach TBO and even go well beyond.

Of course this is total hogwash. No one can predict the future accurately by relying solely on past events. There are inspections such as the SB388C “Valve Wobble” test to check for hidden wear, and even invasive inspections like pulling cylinders to look at the cam and tappet bodies for spalling and corrosion to help determine if the engine is healthy. The manufacturer (Lycoming) has established a TBO based on field experience. What Lycoming has actually said is the criteria for determining what the REAL TBO for a particular engine should be is in Lycoming SI 1009AR, and is based on 12 calendar years, OR 2000 hours, WHICH EVER COMES FIRST. (Or 2400 for O-235C and O-235L series in the AA-1x, under certain restrictions.)

Now, how do you feel about that 30-year-old engine with “mid-time”? It’s already 250% past it’s factory recommended TBO! Busting the TBO by a few percent is one thing, by 2-1/2 times is another?

The Inspection Process

The inspection should be performed on the plane after the owner and the prospective purchaser have met, flown the plane, and negotiated a price for sale ‘in its stated condition. ‘ The buyer should ask for and the seller should supply a complete list of every known squawk. This along with the Total Time of the airframe, engine and prop, the list of installed equipment and an accounting of the life limited components (spar tubes and wing attach shoulder bolts on AA-5x/AG-5B series, no life limited parts on the AA-1x series) comprise the documentation of the stated condition.

At this point, the price has been agreed to, the buyer wants to purchase the plane, and the seller is willing to sell and warrant the plane to be as represented.

The seller now schedules the Pre-Purchase Inspection, with the intent of determining if the plane meets the stated condition. The purpose is not to pick the airplane to pieces and scare away the buyer or to find thousands of dollars worth of work the seller should pay for, rather it is to establish the true condition of the plane for comparison with the previously prepared squawk list. It’s possible (and desirable) to do a PPI on a WRECKED plane. Again, the purpose is to bring to light the true condition of the plane, so that both parties are aware and accept the current condition as the basis for the sale.

It’s quite common to surprise the owner with items that are worn, cracked, corroded, etc. And the seller and buyer make adjustments in the price to account for them, or the seller has them repaired to everyone’s satisfaction, in order to bring the plane back to the previously stated condition, upon which the sale price was negotiated.

Christmas Presents

I was talking today with a Grumman owner who was curious what Xmas presents we might have for friends and family to give him this year. Fifty dollars was the target, so we talked about Rudder Springs )sexy right?), air vent kits, nav lense kits, spark plugs (2 for $50), etc.

While we are on Christmas, if you care about your feet being comfortable, then let me tell you about the socks that Luann just bought for me. They are called ‘Spyder’ 3 to a pack and quite comfortable even for long days on the concrete floor of the shop.

New Traveler Emblems

The original Travelers came out with this emblem on the fuselage, below the canopy aft of the pilot. We have just completed this project and have orders a supply.

Also in the works are similar emblems for each of the 2-seaters, Yankee, Trainer, TR-2, T-Cat, and Lynx. We did not leave out the 4-seaters and have the Traveler pictured here, along with Cheetah and Tiger.

Wrench and Elbow Bending

We have scheduled another in this popular series for this coming January in Kahului HI.   Bill Baldwin has loaned us the use of his hangar with some overflow. Should bring some much needed maintenance to some of our flock.

Inboard Fuel Tank Leak

I have a fairly recently purchased Tiger that has developed a fuel leak near the wing root right along the rubber trim gasket that goes around the wing. I’m assuming this is bad news and was wondering if you could give me a ballpark quote as to the amount of $ we are talking to reseal the tank.

Since it is leaking in the inboard section, it can only be from three sources.

The tank itself, usually under the spar,  that means a inboard rib scrape and clean and a reseal and test, and then maybe another reseal.  Figure 1,000 dollars or more.

Fuel or vent lines, not likely but it does happen.  Maybe $100.

Fuel sender or fuel sender gasket leaking.  Usually just a gasket change after draining the tank. Under $200 for sealing and gasket.  More if sender is leaking.

Any long persistent fuel leak will leave a blue stain, if long enough in time, then it will look black and tar like.

 

October 31, 2017, Volume XXII

Happy Halloween GPA!

No tricks, but here are some treats!

Videos

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

434 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 39 this last month bringing total to 392
Views 10,908 last 28 days with a total of 62,655 views.
Watch time 46,730 minutes for the last 28 days.

New Video Formats

There are a couple of new types of videos that we have tried. One uses the Savvy maintenance data display to show engine-operating levels such as CHT, Fuel Flow, and RPM. In other videos we use still and text panels to carry the message.

Keep the suggestions coming.

Membership

1252 Members as of this newsletter.

One member has sold his Tiger so we lost one, but we got another the same day.

Forum Posts

Delamination on trailing edge of wing

Posted on October 31st, 2017 by Randy Norris

My 75 Traveler has several 4” to 10” long delaminated areas on the top and bottom of the trailing edge of the wing & horizontal stabilizer. I have found the SK125A paper, but it seems to just addres the ailerons. Am i misinterpreting this and the rivet protocol is what I HAVE to do, or Read more


Not sure where to ask this

Posted on October 29th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Not sure where to ask this

So for the last month I have owned a 1979 tiger and I couldn’t be happier. The only problem is getting it back into the hanger and it was a bear to push. So I set up a winch that Pulls backwards from the front. Not my design OK clearly stole it from someone else Read more


Canopy cleaning

Posted on October 29th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

What is the consensus on the best product to clean the canopy? And is it actually plexiglass or is it real glass?


There is a YouTube video covering plastic products, ‘LP Plastic Window Polishes – Grumman Style’, Enjoy!

Airplane Prices

One of the things that the GPA helps people with is finding their own Grumman.  So we have a fairly good idea of the price of the planes that are selling.  We do also see the same birds over and over.

Prices are up right now on Grummans so there are a lot of planes on the market that have been sitting for awhile with brand new price tags.  Shop with care and be sure and demand a good pre-purchase from a knowledgeable Grumman shop.

September 27, 2017 – Volume XXII,

Trio Autopilot

Just a quick reminder that if you are interested in a Trio autopilot (roll steering and altitude hold) that the expected price is $8,000 and the delivery time frame if 25 Grumman owners are interested is prior to end of 2017.  Paul is actually shooting for late November.

For those who choose to wait, it may be over a year before they circle back to making install kits again for the Grummans.

Ken Blackman, Dave Fletcher and Roscoe are working with them for a hell-hole (under the rear seat) install of both servo for a quick and clean installation.

Just wanted everyone to know about it so there will be no hard feeling for those left out.  I know of 4 owners who have sent their money as oi this writing.

Send your check for $2,000.00 USD to:

The STC Group
3168 Jacinto Avenue
Simi Valley, CA 93063

also send the following:

Your Name
Aircraft Type
Serial Number
Registration Number
System Voltage
Panel mount or round-hole mount

Stay tuned for the findings.

September 20, 2017, Volume XXI

Well fall will be upon us tomorrow, here is a bit of news to help you pass the time until then.

Videos

To help with finding videos we have added a complete video list that will be maintained to the website as an option under “Channel” option. i.e. Channel-> YouTube Video List

347 videos now in the collection.
Subscribers 31 this last month bringing total to 338
Views 7,102 last 28 days with a total of 47,557 views.
Watch time 38,222 minutes for the last 28 days.

New Video Formats

There are a couple of new types of videos that we have tried. One uses the Savvy maintenance data display to show engine-operating levels such as CHT, Fuel Flow, and RPM. In other videos we use still and text panels to carry the message.

Keep the suggestions coming.

New Grumman Shop

There is a new Grumman shop on the east coast, “Mid Atlantic Yankee Aviation” located at Eagle’s Nest (31E) run by Jimmy Candeletti.

Membership

1212 Members as of this newsletter.

One member has sold his Tiger so we lost one, but we got another the same day.

Forum Posts

Starter Issues

Posted on August 24th, 2017 by Pat

We have been experiencing a starting problem since the middle of the summer. Pushing the start button we hear the new starter relay (changed out yesterday) engage with a good snap but the starter doesn’t engage with the fly wheel. The only sound when pressing the start button is the relay snap. Is my next Read more


Is this ok?

Posted on August 25th, 2017 by Ray Seligman

Is this ok?

I have found a Grumman tiger that I have fallen in love with. It has about 590 hours SMOH age. I was there when they run a compression check and they were all at about 77. Then they cut open the oil filter and they found this. I am being told this is completely normal. Read more


Fuel Sump Rust?

Posted on June 30th, 2017 by Peter B

Fuel Sump Rust?

Can anyone shed some light on to what is causing this rust? I appreciate it! (see pic attached)


Events and Gatherings

Red Steward – Rained out

Eclipse – Awesome

Independence – Good turnout

Treo Autopilot STC

For those interested in one of the new autopilots, if we can get 30 Grumman owners to commit, we can each save $1,000.00 off of the Autopilot STC Price. That would be $7,000 for each of us. Contact Gwena Odum, (805) 624-1516 to put your name on the list. They are asking for a $2,000 deposit and hope to have this all done by April. Give them a call, as they need 25 folks to push our planes ahead in the line of airframes.

Cheap Planes

First rule of aircraft buying, always buy the best plane you can afford.

Case in point, one member bought a derelict plane that had sat for 20 years and he thought he was getting a good deal at buying it for $10,000.  First thing he did was put a new Lycoming engine on the plane which set him back $42,000 for the engine and the labor.  His old engine was not a worthy core.

So with faded and peeling original paint, corrosion on the surface skin, broken plastic, original worn interior and carpets and no avionics he had over $55,000 in a plane he could have sold for mid to low-thirties.

So buy the best plane you can afford and get a good pre-purchase from someone who know Grummans.

Magazine Articles

We have 42 articles from 1967 to August of 2017 talking about our line of aircraft. They can be found under INFO -> MAGAZINE ARTICLES.

Across the USA

Neal Coyle (one of our very early members) is relocating from South Carolina to Medford, OR and is taking 2 weeks to zig-zag across the US at 2500 MSL and see the sights. Look for him and N430BS at an airport near you.

Humor

With all the talk of AI (artificial intelligence) and self driving cars these days, I would like to that Gene T for reminding me of a computer joke from the 1960’s.

Folks are on an airliners and the cabin system comes on and announces that the plane will under computer control for the entire flight and there fore much safer than in human hands. The computer voice let folks know of the route, cruising altitude and finally let them know how safe they will be during the flight. As a final bit of encouragement the computer says, “Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong, Nothing can go wrong. . .”

Compression Test

Airplane was recently in for annual when one cylinder was at 52 when all the others were at 76. The cylinder was leaking past the intake. Owner was a bit concerned but the intake in not a critical area like the exhaust. So the plane was pulled out and run for a few minutes at fairly high power and then shutdown. Reading after that was 75.